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Article in local news paper

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Pam Alexson single mother of 3 wonderful young adults;a special ed teacher, an RN and a senior accountant. Find out more about Pam Alexson
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  • Article in local news paper

    Hi everyone,

    I just read this article and I know it will be of interest to many of you. I am sorry I need more computer skills to post it here and my computer geek is away at college so please accept my limitations. I will post the site here. Just refer to the article , "NA man on mission".

    http://www.thesunchronicle.com/artic...city/city3.txt

    I also just spoke with a student intern at the National Center for Early Defibrilation. She is going to send me a book and a packet of information . This site has lots of info and those who want to know , all of us right? can learn how to use a defibrilator (AED demo) via several video's. Their site is:

    http://www.early-defib.org

    I hope you find this informative and helpfull. Have a nice day .
    Pam
    Dx @ 47 with HOCM & HF:11/00
    Guidant ICD:Mar.01, Recalled/replaced:6/05 w/ Medtronic device
    Lead failure,replaced 12/06.
    SF lead recall:07,extracted leads and new device 2012
    [email protected] Tufts, Boston:10/5/03; age 50. ( [email protected] 240 mmHg ++)
    Paroxysmal A-Fib: 06-07,2010 controlled w/sotalol dosing
    Genetic mutation 4/09, mother(d), brother, son, gene+
    Mother of 3, grandma of 3:Tim,27,Sarah,33w/6 y/o old Sophia, 5 y/o Jack, Laura 34, w/ 5 y/o old Benjamin

  • #2
    Re: Article in local news paper

    Pam, I was going to post it but the page has changed and the article isn't there now. Sorry.

    Reenie
    Reenie

    ****************
    Husband has HCM.
    3 kids - ages 23, 21, & 19. All presently clear of HCM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Article in local news paper

      Reenie ,

      I changed the web site because the newspaper moved it, so if you or someone catches it please post it( IF only I knew how) . And thank you.

      Pam
      Dx @ 47 with HOCM & HF:11/00
      Guidant ICD:Mar.01, Recalled/replaced:6/05 w/ Medtronic device
      Lead failure,replaced 12/06.
      SF lead recall:07,extracted leads and new device 2012
      [email protected] Tufts, Boston:10/5/03; age 50. ( [email protected] 240 mmHg ++)
      Paroxysmal A-Fib: 06-07,2010 controlled w/sotalol dosing
      Genetic mutation 4/09, mother(d), brother, son, gene+
      Mother of 3, grandma of 3:Tim,27,Sarah,33w/6 y/o old Sophia, 5 y/o Jack, Laura 34, w/ 5 y/o old Benjamin

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Article in local news paper

        Thanks to Google News, here is the link to the article.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Article in local news paper

          Now THAT’S what I call news worthy of the print. Absolutely marvelous.

          The only concern I might have with anything in the article is the training of high school students prior to graduation. I think it would also be appropriate to train students prior to elementary school graduation. I still remember lots from my elementary school years, and the added protection for high schoolers would certainly be a benefit.

          While I’m nit picking, how about a law that not only says an ICD should be in every school – how about adding that it should also be brought to every field activity?

          This news goes a long way toward saving additional lives, and I wish them every success in their future endeavors. Seems like common sense (that rare commodity) is taking hold in more and more places. Hurrah, hurrah.
          Burt

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Article in local news paper

            Burt,
            I agree but first we got to move the little rocks before we try to move the bolders. Good thing is there is movement going on, right ?

            Pam
            Dx @ 47 with HOCM & HF:11/00
            Guidant ICD:Mar.01, Recalled/replaced:6/05 w/ Medtronic device
            Lead failure,replaced 12/06.
            SF lead recall:07,extracted leads and new device 2012
            [email protected] Tufts, Boston:10/5/03; age 50. ( [email protected] 240 mmHg ++)
            Paroxysmal A-Fib: 06-07,2010 controlled w/sotalol dosing
            Genetic mutation 4/09, mother(d), brother, son, gene+
            Mother of 3, grandma of 3:Tim,27,Sarah,33w/6 y/o old Sophia, 5 y/o Jack, Laura 34, w/ 5 y/o old Benjamin

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Article in local news paper

              You betcha Pam,
              It is a giant leap forward, but although there is much to celebrate in getting the pebbles moving (actually I think these could be called rocks already), but if we don’t keep our eye on the boulders we will never get them moving at all.

              It may sound a bit trite, but it really is a life and death situation. We have to figure every step forward is that many more lives saved. The way I feel about it, I may be a sick old man, but I hope with my last breath on this earth I have the strength to spit in death’s eye.
              Burt

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Article in local news paper

                NA man on a mission
                BY RICK FOSTER/SUN CHRONICLE STAFF

                NORTH ATTLEBORO -- Two weeks ago Bob Schriever celebrated his second `` rebirth day.''

                On a bright September day two years ago, Schriever's heart stopped while refereeing a high school football game. Thanks to a portable defibrillator brought to the game by an athletic trainer, Schriever was revived and now lives a normal life.

                Each year, however, thousands of Americans who suffer sudden cardiac arrest never awaken, even though estimates indicate half or more might survive if they received a prompt electric shock to the heart from a defibrillator.

                `` Each year 360,000 Americans suffer sudden cardiac arrest,'' says Schriever, who now serves as a spokesman for the National Center for Early Defibrillation. `` If you think about the old Foxboro Stadium, that's the equivalent of filling the stands six times.''

                Nationally, only five percent survive such attacks -- less than a third of a sellout crowd at a New England Patriots home game.

                Currently, the North Attleboro resident is lobbying for programs to train high school students how to perform CPR and operate defibrillators as well as to require defibrillators in schools and public buildings.

                He was also involved in the campaign to allow over-the-counter sale of defibrillation equipment -- recently approved by the FDA.

                Modern defibrillators require no advanced training and are capable of evaluating stricken patients to determine whether a shock is needed. If it is, an electrical impulse is automatically administered to return the heart to its normal rhythm.

                Schriever was one of 42 survivors of cardiac arrest who recently appeared in a video demonstrating the need for defibrillators and thanking emergency service personnel and others for their life-saving efforts.

                Schriever, 63, has a wife, two children and six grandchildren and a comfortable life in this suburban town. But he wouldn't still be experiencing it if an athletic trainer from Newton North High School hadn't remembered to bring a portable device called an automatic external defibrillator to the game at Wellesley High School.

                `` Just before the game, he came up to me and explained that he was late because he had to go back and get his AED,'' said Schreiver. `` I told him I was glad and I remember saying, `You never know when you'll need something like that.'''

                An hour and a half later, the person who needed it was Schreiver.

                Schreiver, who experienced no pain, collapsed without warning in front of his 9-year-old grandson. He later learned that the episode was most likely triggered by a sudden blockage in his heart.

                The local resident said he's campaigning for greater availability of defibrillators and widespread training to use them because of the thousands of lives now being lost that could otherwise be preserved.

                `` We're not just talking about older people,'' Schriever said. `` A lot of those who suffer sudden cardiac arrests are just kids. They've got their whole lives ahead.''

                Cardiac arrest can strike without pain and without warning in people of all ages, Schriever said, and can be triggered by a heart defect, a sudden blockage or even being struck in the chest by a baseball on the playground.

                Even when cardio-pulmonary resuscitation is applied, many die without prompt defibrillation.

                Schriever, who also serves as vice president of the nationwide Sudden Cardiac Arrest Survivors Network, brings the message home to parents, school officials and health care providers at speeches and presentations all across the country.

                Often, he accompanies his talk with a short video about Louis Acomporra, a 14-year-old high school lacrosse goalie who collapsed after a hard shot struck him in the chest.

                Acomporra, who received CPR but no defibrillation, failed to respond.

                `` It's very, very powerful,'' Schriever said of the film. `` It never fails to get to people.''

                Currently, several states mandate defibrillators in all school buildings. A few cities -- including Seattle, Wash. -- require that high school students receive CPR and defibrillator training.

                Recently, state Rep. Patricia Haddad, D-Somerset, said she would introduce legislation that would make such instruction part of the graduation requirement for all Massachusetts high school students. Somerset recently became the first Massachusetts public school system to require such instruction and will soon begin classes for all 1,000 high school students.

                Schriever met last week with Haddad and representatives of Operation Defibrillator, which advocates placing defibrillators in all school buildings.

                Already, Schriever says, there's evidence that training more individuals to deliver CPR and operate defibrillators can extend the lives of many who would otherwise die. In Seattle, where CPR and defibrillator training is compulsory, the survival rate has climbed to 38 percent.

                The North Attleboro resident says there's no measuring the benefits he's received.

                Recently his grandson, who calls Schriever `` Dat,'' looked disappointed when he learned his grandfather had to leave to officiate at a Pop Warner football game.

                The youngster brightened up when his granddad invited him to tag along.

                `` Dat, I love being with you,'' the boy said.

                The remark, said Schriever, tells it all.

                (Editor's note: Bob Schriever is available to address local groups about the importance of early defibrillation in saving lives. He can be reached through the National Center for Early Defibrillation at 866-233-4636.)
                Reenie

                ****************
                Husband has HCM.
                3 kids - ages 23, 21, & 19. All presently clear of HCM.

                Comment

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