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Headline: Experts Find Test For Sudden Death Syndrome

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  • Headline: Experts Find Test For Sudden Death Syndrome

    Copyright 2003 The Press Association Limited
    Press Association

    June 2, 2003, Monday

    SECTION: HOME NEWS

    LENGTH: 442 words

    HEADLINE: EXPERTS FIND TEST FOR SUDDEN DEATH SYNDROME

    BYLINE: Julie Wheldon, Health Correspondent, PA News

    BODY:
    Experts have discovered a new test which will help predict who might be at
    risk from Sudden Adult Death Syndrome, it was announced today.

    A study funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) has found a way to
    assess the risk of Sudden Adult Death Syndrome (SADS) by measuring the amount of
    "electrical disorganisation" in the heart.

    The discovery means those identified as being at high risk of SADS could be
    fitted with a device which could kick-start the heart, and so prevent them
    dying.

    It is thought about one in 500 people in the UK suffers from Hypertrophic
    Cardiomyopathy which is one type of SADS and the most common cause of sudden
    death in young athletes.

    The study found, for the first time, that identifying this type of electrical
    disturbance could help prevent SADS in people suffering from a range of
    different diseases where the heart may seem otherwise normal in routine tests.

    SADS occurs when the heart goes into ventricular fibrillation (VF), or
    cardiac arrest, and is unable to pump blood round the body effectively.

    Until now it has been difficult to assess whether someone is at risk from
    sudden death because there is little understanding of the mechanisms that cause
    VF.

    The new research paves the way for a test so that experts can assess if
    someone is at risk of SADS.

    Those found to be at high risk could then be fitted with a device called an
    internal cardio defibrillator, which would help prevent sudden death by
    kick-starting the heart.

    The study was carried out by researchers in England, Poland, the Netherlands
    and France.

    Lead researcher Dr Richard Saumarez, of Papworth Hospital, near Cambridge,
    said: "In the past the ways of telling whether someone was at risk from the
    onset of sudden death were very limited.

    "This new research identifies a mechanism by which SADS occurs that can be
    detected in patients at risk."

    Professor Sir Charles George, Medical Director at the British Heart
    Foundation, said; "This research is a significant step in the better
    understanding of SADS.

    "People suffering from SADS may not have any symptoms from the condition and
    a fatal cardiac arrest may be the first sign that it is present in a family.

    "In time this test could be used for such people and their relatives to
    determine just what their real risk is and help prevent further deaths in the
    family."

    Alison Cox of the charity Cardiac Risk in the Young (CRY) said: "This is a
    very exciting and important step in understanding SADS and how we can identify
    those at risk.

    "Any research in this area is fantastic and it will offer great reassurance
    to our families that something is being done."

    LOAD-DATE: June 2, 2003
    Thanks, Tim
    Forum Administrator

  • #2
    Re: Headline: Experts Find Test For Sudden Death Syndrome

    Copyright 2003 Regional Independent Media

    Yorkshire Post

    June 1, 2003

    LENGTH: 291 words

    HEADLINE: Experts discover test for sudden adult death risk

    SOURCE: Yorkshire Post

    BODY:


    Experts have discovered a new test which will help predict who might be at
    risk from Sudden Adult Death Syndrome.





    A study funded by the British Heart Foundation has found a way to assess the
    risk of Sads by measuring the amount of electrical disorganisation in the heart.

    The discovery means those identified as being at high risk of Sads could be
    fitted with a device which could kick-start the heart, and so prevent them
    dying.

    It is thought about one in 500 people in the UK suffers from hypertrophic
    cardiomyopathy which is one type of Sads and the most common cause of sudden
    death in young athletes.

    The study found, for the first time, that identifying this type of electrical
    disturbance could help prevent Sads in people suffering from a range of
    different diseases where the heart may seem otherwise normal in routine tests.

    Sads occurs when the heart goes into ventricular fibrillation (VF), or
    cardiac arrest, and is unable to pump blood round the body effectively. Until
    now it has been difficult to assess whether someone is at risk from sudden death
    because there is little understanding of the mechanisms that cause VF.

    The study was carried out by researchers in England, Poland, the Netherlands
    and France.

    Alison Cox of the charity Cardiac Risk in the Young said: This is a very
    exciting and important step in understanding Sads and how we can identify those
    at risk.

    Last month the Yorkshire Post highlighted the case of Craig Johnson, a
    student in his final year of studies at Sheffield Hallam University whose death
    has been put down to Sads.

    He had been chatting to a friend in his car outside the university before
    getting out to lock the door but became dizzy and collapsed to the floor.

    LOAD-DATE: June 2, 2003
    Thanks, Tim
    Forum Administrator

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Headline: Experts Find Test For Sudden Death Syndrome

      This is the worst reporting I've ever read. What is the test? How is it done? Is this a fancy EPS? What in the world? Am I missing something? I've read the first one twice and I don't see anything about what the test actually _is_ --am I wrong?

      weird.
      S

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Headline: Experts Find Test For Sudden Death Syndrome

        Here is another one ... I don't write them, I just post them.

        Copyright Health Media Ltd 2003

        Health Newswire Consumer

        June 2, 2003

        SECTION: Health Newswire Consumer

        LENGTH: 316 words

        HEADLINE: Test for "sudden adult death syndrome"

        BYLINE: Health Newswire reporters

        HIGHLIGHT:
        Scientists may now be able to identify which people might be at an increased
        risk of suffering from so-called sudden adult death syndrome (SADS).

        BODY:


        It is thought that SADS results from electrical "disorganisation" in the
        heart, which causes lethal rhythms that can lead to sudden death as the heart is
        unable to effectively pump blood around the body.

        Previous studies have suggested that around 1 in 500 people in the UK suffer
        from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy - a condition that is one form of SADS and the
        most common cause of sudden death in young athletes.

        Now researchers from Papworth Hospital near Cambridge have identified an
        abnormality in the heart that will help doctors predict who is at risk from this
        electrical disturbance.

        The team say the findings should help prevent SADS in people suffering from
        a range of different diseases including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated
        cardiomyopathy and long QT syndrome - conditions in which the heart appears
        normal in routine tests.

        The findings pave the way for a new test that would be able to assess an
        individual's risk from these lethal rhythms.

        The researchers add that, once identified, people at high risk of SADS could
        be fitted with a device called an internal cardio defibrillator that would help
        kick start the heart into the correct rhythm.

        Dr Saumarez, lead researcher for the project, said, "In the past, the ways
        of telling whether someone was at risk from the onset of sudden death were very
        limited. This new research identifies a mechanism by which SADS occurs that can
        be detected in patients at risk."

        Professor Sir Charles George, medical director at the British Heart
        Foundation, which funded the study, added, "People suffering from SADS may not
        have any symptoms from the condition and a fatal cardiac arrest may be the first
        sign that it is present in a family.

        "In time, this test could be used for such people and their relatives to
        determine just what their real risk is and help prevent further deaths in the
        family."

        LOAD-DATE: June 2, 2003
        Thanks, Tim
        Forum Administrator

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Headline: Experts Find Test For Sudden Death Syndrome

          Here is the actual press release. I don't beleive that there is any additional information available to report.

          http://www.bhf.org.uk/news/index.asp...809&artID=3691
          Thanks, Tim
          Forum Administrator

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Headline: Experts Find Test For Sudden Death Syndrome

            Tim,

            Thanks for posting the report. Anytime good news is availalble, proven or unproven, it is definitely uplifting. Thank you for taking time to post your findings.

            Sincerely,

            Bert

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Headline: Experts Find Test For Sudden Death Syndrome

              It would seem that this test is still in the developement/proving stage and not yet available, but exciting news to offer. We'll just have to wait and see how it unfolds. Tim does a great job at finding and posting these info pieces. Thanks, Tim. I know you'll find the "rest of the story" when it becomes available. Linda

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Headline: Experts Find Test For Sudden Death Syndrome

                Copyright 2003 The Liverpool Daily Post & Echo Ltd

                Daily Post (Liverpool)

                June 3, 2003, Tuesday

                SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 25

                LENGTH: 396 words

                HEADLINE: NEW TEST WARNING FOR HEART VICTIMS;
                N WALES MOTHER WELCOMES DISCOVERY

                BYLINE: CARL BUTLER

                BODY:


                EXPERTS have unveiled a new test to help predict people at risk from Sudden
                Adult Death Syndrome.

                The development has been welcomed by a North Wales mother who lost one
                daughter to the killer gene but saved a second after persuading her to undergo
                tests.

                A study funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF)has found a way to
                assess the risk of Sudden Adult Death Syndrome (SADS)by measuring the amount of
                "electrical disorganisation" in the heart.

                The discovery means those identified as being at high risk of SADS could be
                fitted with a device which could kick-start the heart and so prevent them dying.

                Mrs Doreen Harley,from Connah's Quay, is the North Wales representative for
                the charity Cardiac Risk in the Young (CRY)and has campaigned tirelessly to
                introduce screening.

                Her daughter Lisa Jane Browne, a 27-year-old nurse, fell victim to sudden
                cardiac death in January 1998.

                The family eventually discovered she had Long QT Syndrome.

                The sound of her alarm going off one morning caused the abnormal gene to
                stop her heart.

                Mrs Harley and husband Terry were both screened following Lisa's's death and
                Terry was diagnosed with the same condition, which is now controlled by
                medication.

                Last March tragedy almost struck the family for a second time when Mrs
                Harley's's other daughter, Nurse Rachel Willn, 30,of Nuneaton, was wok en
                suddenly by the shouting of her two-year-old son Adam. Rachel, who had acted on
                the advice of her mum,has been tested for the condition.

                And because medication proved unsuitable, she underwent surgery for an
                implantable cardioverter defibrillator/pacemaker (ICD). When Rachel woke
                suddenly her heart stopped and she blacked out but the ICD kick-started her
                heart again.

                She had her own children tested for the condition and discovered her eldest
                son Jack, six, also has Long QT Syndrome. It is thought about one in 500 people
                in the UK suffers from Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy which is one type of SADS.

                The latest study found,for the first time, that identifying this type of
                electrical disturbance could help prevent SADS in people suffering from a range
                of different diseases where the heart may seem otherwise normal in routine
                tests.

                The condition happens when the heart goes into ventricular fibrillation
                (VF),or cardiac arrest,and is unable to pump blood round the body effectively.

                GRAPHIC: Doreen Harley, whosedaughter,Lisa Jane Browne, right,died of Long QT;
                Syndrome; Main picture: STACEY ROBERTS

                LOAD-DATE: June 3, 2003
                Thanks, Tim
                Forum Administrator

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Headline: Experts Find Test For Sudden Death Syndrome

                  I don't know if this is related at all but I think it is so.

                  When I was getting my referral to go to Boston to see the NEMC group my cardiologist wrote up a report to convince the insurance company that I was in desperate need to get there he did mention about my EP study which at that time was negative. He later went to say " that there is a group in London that were able to show predictive electrophysiological studies, but their protocol is quite complex, requiring evaluated computerized mapping of the ventricles to evaluate fractionation of action potentials".

                  Came to find out though that I had 3 of 6 risk factors so I got an ICD. I just wonder if this is the same test that they have described in the press releases? If so what are the precentages of accurate diagnosis?

                  mary S.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Headline: Experts Find Test For Sudden Death Syndrome

                    Hi Tim,
                    Finally got to this post. thanks for posting all the articles, we can at least see that the research is out there.

                    Laura
                    Laura Johnson

                    Comment

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