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  • Another HCM related death: swimmer with HCM drowned

    [code] The Associated Press State & Local Wire

    The materials in the AP file were compiled by The Associated Press. These
    materials may not be republished without the express written consent of The
    Associated Press.

    March 6, 2003, Thursday, BC cycle

    12:19 AM Eastern Time

    SECTION: Sports News

    LENGTH: 486 words

    HEADLINE: Autopsy: swimmer with heart condition drowned

    BYLINE: By JAYMES SONG, AP Sports Writer

    DATELINE: HONOLULU

    BODY:
    A University of Hawaii freshman swimmer who drowned during practice suffered
    from a heart condition, an autopsy revealed Wednesday.

    Mike Sheldt, 18, had hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a disorder of the heart
    muscle that generally includes enlargement of the heart and a thickening of the
    walls of the left ventricle, the city medical examiner's office said.

    The disorder was a "contributing factor" in his drowning Tuesday, the office
    said.

    Coach Mike Anderson and team physician Dr. Andrew Nichols said they had not
    been aware Sheldt had any medical problems. They were also unaware of any drugs
    or supplements he might have been taking, noting that there are rigorous NCAA
    guidelines.

    "All the kids are required to undergo a thorough screening with our medical
    staff before the season starts," Anderson said. "Both a long, involved
    questionnaire and a regular physical with a doctor. And there was nothing that
    indicated, at that time, any preexisting conditions."

    Sheldt is the first Hawaii athlete to die during practice or an event in at
    least 30 years.

    Teammates pulled Sheldt, of Charlotte, N.C., from the bottom of the pool at
    the school's Duke Kahanamoku Aquatics Complex and attempted to resuscitate him.
    He was taken to Straub Clinic & Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

    "The training partner noticed he'd gone down," athletic director Herman
    Frazier said. "I had heard perhaps 15 seconds or so and we reacted and responded
    as quickly as possible."

    Nichols said a portable defibrillator was also used in the attempt to revive
    Sheldt. Nichols would not comment on Sheldt's vital signs.

    "Certainly we had no indication that he had any type of serious ongoing
    problem that predisposed him to these tragic conditions," he said.

    There were more than 20 people in or around the pool during the incident.
    Frazier said safety precautions were followed "by the book."

    School officials have counseled Sheldt's grieving teammates, who practiced
    Wednesday.

    "This is what Mike would've wanted - is his teammates to go on without him,"
    Anderson said. "It's with a broken heart and a lot of sadness. Our kids and our
    coaches, we're showing some cracks, but we're not broken and we're going to go
    on."

    Sheldt swam in the 200 and 400 individual medleys and was one of Hawaii's
    rising stars.

    "I knew Mike well and he was a promising young athlete and scholar,"
    university President Evan Dobelle said. "His loss is personally devastating to
    me, and I am struggling to make sense of a situation that has no explanation."

    In high school, Sheldt was a state champion swimmer in North Carolina and a
    member of the National Honor Society.

    "We are all shocked. We are all numb from the loss of Mike Sheldt," Anderson
    said. "He loved Hawaii and loved being with our team. Loved to surf. Loved to
    swim. And loved his teammates."

    Sheldt's parents arrived in Honolulu on Wednesday evening.

    LOAD-DATE: March 6, 2003[/code]
    Thanks, Tim
    Forum Administrator

  • #2
    Thank you for posting this Tim.

    My prayers are with Mike Sheldt and his family. May God Bless Mike and be with his family and the University of Hawaii and his swim team as they greave his loss.

    Love and Light,
    Sharon

    Comment


    • #3
      More ...

      [code] 1 of 3 DOCUMENTS

      Copyright 2003 The Honolulu Advertiser (Honolulu, HI)
      All Rights Reserved
      The Honolulu Advertiser (Honolulu, HI)

      March 8, 2003 Saturday

      SECTION: SPORTS; Pg. 1D

      LENGTH: 1132 words

      HEADLINE: Swimmer's parents appreciate support

      BYLINE: Masuoka Brandon, Staff

      BODY:
      UH swim team honors late Sheldt during meet

      By Brandon Masuoka, ADVERTISER STAFF WRITER

      In the first swimming event since the drowning of 18-year-old University of
      Hawai'i swimmer Mike Sheldt, his parents yesterday thanked everyone for the
      outpouring of support for their son.

      Sheldt, of Charlotte, N.C., had an undetected heart problem that likely
      caused him to lose consciousness and drown at the start of practice on Tuesday
      at Duke Kahanamoku Aquatic Complex pool, according to the medical examiner.

      It was the first death of a UH athlete in practice or in competition in at
      least 30 years, school officials said.

      Yesterday, Sheldt's parents, Mike and Shawnee, hugged each other as the
      Hawai'i swim team honored their son at a qualifying meet with a moment of
      silence, a convocation by the Rev. Sherman Thompson, a Hawaiian chant and the
      release of colored doves that represented Sheldt's free spirit.

      The swim team also left a swimming lane vacant during the events Sheldt would
      have competed in.

      "We have been amazed by the outpouring of the aloha spirit," said Shawnee
      Sheldt. "I'm not just talking about the swim team, or just from the university
      community. This hospitality and the warmth has meant so much and has been so
      helpful. It just makes us smile."

      Dozens of well-wishers have posted messages on a website organized by
      Sheldt's former swim club, the Mecklenburg Aquatic Club (N.C.). The majority of
      the messages - some from lovestruck girls - talked about Sheldt's good looks,
      his athletic talents and his character.

      "He was always happy with a smile on his face," said Hawai'i sophomore
      teammate Nick Cabebe. "Whenever somebody was down, he would just crack a joke
      and make everybody smile. He always led the team in cheers."

      Hawai'i swim coach Mike Anderson called Sheldt an intense competitor, a
      friend and a true waterman who swam and surfed. In his tribute to Sheldt,
      Anderson urged the more than 100 people at the pool to honor Sheldt and "swim
      hard, compete well, and to yourself be true." He ended his speech with, "Let's
      roll."

      Sheldt drowned after he fainted from an undetected heart problem, said Dr.
      William Goodhue, the first deputy medical examiner who performed the autopsy on
      Sheldt.

      University of Hawai'i Athletic Director Herman Frazier said he was told
      Sheldt was underwater for "15 seconds or so" before being pulled from the pool.

      Gone too early in life

      Goodhue said Sheldt suffered from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a primary
      disease of the heart muscle, and one of the most common causes of sudden
      unexplained death in young athletes during or after physical exertion.

      Goodhue said people with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are susceptible to
      cardiac arrhythmias, or irregular heartbeats, which can cause brief loss of
      consciousness. He said Sheldt likely sustained an irregular heartbeat while in
      the water, lost consciousness, and drowned.

      "If he had this fainting episode outside of the water, it is possible that
      the irregularity might have been severe enough that he would have died
      nonetheless," Goodhue said. "On the other hand, if the irregularity only
      resulted in transient fainting it is possible he may not have died because he
      would have been breathing air."

      Goodhue, who classified Sheldt's death as accidental, said sudden death may
      be the first sign of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Goodhue said the final autopsy
      report is pending additional laboratory and tissue studies and should be
      completed within several weeks.

      Dr. Robert Hong, a cardiologist at The Queen's Medical Center, said anyone
      who is going into competitive athletics, who has a history of passing out, chest
      pain and progressive shortness of breath, should be seen by a doctor.

      Preventing similar cases

      He said usually the evaluation would include doing a electrocardiogram, or an
      electrical monitor, and may include a soundwave study of the heart, called an
      echocardiogram, to figure out where the heart has thickened.

      When asked if additional medical screening should be done for athletes, Hong
      said there are differing opinions that take into consideration costs and other
      concerns.

      Sheldt passed his physical examination and pre-participation physical before
      the season, he did not exhibit any signs of a heart problem, and appeared to be
      in top shape, UH officials said.

      "There's four million high school athletes and 500,000 college athletes,"
      Hong said. "If you do an echo study on all of them that could potentially be a
      problem; in terms of cost factors, somebody would have to end up paying for it."

      Another problem is, according to Hong, if you subject everyone through
      overkill screening measures, "you may land up doing invasive procedures or
      potentially dangerous things for people who don't have any underlying heart
      conditions."

      Hong said new technology is being investigated with handheld echo cardio
      devices capable of performing mass screenings on athletes, but that's far from
      being a standard.

      "Even among the experts with the most experience in sports medicine, there's
      disagreement on how much routine screening should be done on athletes," Hong
      said.

      Frazier said the school does not plan on changing the current physical
      examination policy that adheres to national standards.

      "As far as we're concerned, our physicals are done similar to every other
      institution like ours throughout the country, and we will continue to do that,"
      Frazier said. "It is very, very sad for us to have to go through this. But I
      think in light of everything we've seen, in any kind of physical, (Sheldt's
      condition) would not have been detected unless you knew there was a history of
      heart problems."

      Satisfied with current policy

      Some of the Hawai'i athletes and former athletes yesterday said they were
      satisfied with the current physical examinations and trusted the UH medical
      staff to detect problems.

      "I would think (the examinations) are adequate," former University of Hawai'i
      football player Vince Manuwai said. "It's going to come down to the players to
      tell the doctors (their ailments)."

      Added Cabebe: "They're pretty much doing a good job. They check every little
      thing. They check your pulse, your heart rate, everything. It's pretty much an
      all-day physical."

      Rainbow basketball player Michael Kuebler said he hoped the physical
      examinations would detect problems, but he said he couldn't know for certain.

      "I don't really know what to say about the tests, because the same situation
      has happened in professional sports," Kuebler said. "It happened to (Reggie
      Lewis) from the Celtics. And I'm sure they do testing three times as much.

      "I really don't know what's adequate to be honest with you," Kuebler added.
      "I really don't know what is a thorough examination. You just do what
      (physicians) tell you to do."

      GRAPHIC: UH swim coach Mike Anderson, left, and athletic director Herman Frazier
      discuss Mike Sheldt's untimely death. ADVERTISER LIBRARY PHOTO * March 5, 2003

      LOAD-DATE: March 9, 2003

      2 of 3 DOCUMENTS

      Copyright 2003 The Honolulu Advertiser (Honolulu, HI)
      All Rights Reserved
      The Honolulu Advertiser (Honolulu, HI)

      March 6, 2003 Thursday

      SECTION: SPORTS; Pg. 1D

      LENGTH: 545 words

      HEADLINE: Swimmer's death linked to heart

      BYLINE: Masuoka Brandon, Staff

      BODY:
      UH says Sheldt passed physicals, was in 'top' shape

      By Brandon Masuoka, ADVERTISER STAFF WRITER

      An undetected heart problem led to the drowning of an 18-year-old University
      of Hawai'i swimmer Tuesday afternoon at Duke Kahanamoku Aquatic Complex pool,
      the chief medical examiner said yesterday.

      Freshman Mike Sheldt, of Charlotte, N.C., was rushed to Straub Hospital after
      he was found by a teammate submerged in 5 feet of water at the start of practice
      on Tuesday. Sheldt was pronounced dead at Straub.

      An autopsy yesterday revealed that Sheldt drowned and that the contributing
      cause was hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or an enlarged heart, Honolulu chief
      medical examiner Dr. Kanthi Von Guenthner said.

      "While he was in the water, he may have had an irregular heart rhythm," Von
      Guenthner said. "An enlarged heart can lead to sudden death, but it's not
      something that's very common."

      Dr. Andrew Nichols, the UH athletic department's physician, yesterday said
      Sheldt had passed a battery of physical exams, had not reported any adverse
      medical history to the school and appeared to be in top shape.

      Sheldt passed his physical examination and pre-participation physical before
      the season and did not exhibit any signs of a heart problem, Nichols said.

      "Had there been findings in a physical examination that are suggestive of a
      congenital heart condition that is known to cause sudden cardiac death, we
      wouldn't clear him to play," Nichols said.

      In the physical exams, student athletes are asked about potential symptoms of
      heart conditions that are known to cause sudden death in young people, Nichols
      said. The medical screening also focuses on identifying physical traits that
      could lead to problems in the future, Nichols said.

      Sheldt's death was the first of a UH athlete during a practice or competition
      in at least 30 years, UH officials said.

      At a press conference yesterday, Nichols and swim coach Mike Anderson said
      Sheldt appeared to be in good health.

      "He was in top physical condition," Anderson said. "He competed in the 400
      individual medley, which is one of the most brutal events in swimming."

      Anderson said Sheldt has been training hard for about 10 years.

      "He passed our physical examination to participate, and he's obviously passed
      previous physical examinations to participate in sports at the high school
      level," Nichols said. "Certainly we had no indication that he had any type of
      serious ongoing problem."

      UH athletic director Herman Frazier said he was told that Sheldt was
      underwater for "15 seconds or so" before being spotted by a teammate and pulled
      from the water.

      "We reacted and responded as quickly as possible," Frazier said.

      Anderson said about 27 people were in the pool Tuesday, watched by four
      assistant coaches and a pool manager.

      "We try to lower our coach-to-athlete ratio to as low as we can possibly get
      it. The coverage was superb," said Anderson, who was on the Mainland at the time
      of the tragedy.

      Patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are at higher risk for sudden death
      than the normal population, and can be affected at a young age, according to the
      National Institutes of Health Web site.

      Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is a well-publicized cause of sudden death in
      athletes, the site said.

      GRAPHIC: Mike Sheldt, upper left, enjoys a happy moment with teammates from
      Myers Park High in North Carolina. A former coach said Sheldt longed to go to
      Hawai'i "where he could combine his passion for competitive swimming and his
      love for surfing."courtesy Mimi Goudes; UH swim coach Mike Anderson, left, and
      athletic director Herman Frazier answer questions surrounding the death of Mike
      Sheldt. GREGORY YAMAMOTO * The Honolulu Advertiser

      LOAD-DATE: March 7, 2003

      3 of 3 DOCUMENTS

      Copyright 2003 The Honolulu Advertiser (Honolulu, HI)
      All Rights Reserved
      The Honolulu Advertiser (Honolulu, HI)

      March 6, 2003 Thursday

      SECTION: SPORTS; Pg. 1D

      LENGTH: 647 words

      HEADLINE: Hawai'i a paradise for N. Carolina surfer

      BYLINE: Masuoka Brandon, Staff

      BODY:
      By Brandon Masuoka, ADVERTISER STAFF WRITER

      As a competitive swimmer for more than 10 years, Mike Sheldt drove himself to
      succeed with the same heart that would eventually take his life.

      Sheldt, an 18-year-old University of Hawai'i freshman, died after he was
      found submerged at the bottom of Duke Kahanamoku Aquatic Complex pool at the
      start of practice on Tuesday. An autopsy revealed that Sheldt drowned and that
      the contributing cause was hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or an enlarged heart.

      Yesterday, coaches remembered the wavy-haired surfer as someone who never
      gave less than 100 percent effort and never met a teammate or person he didn't
      like.

      "He was a very positive young man who worked super hard," UH swimming coach
      Mike Anderson said. "He was always smiling and trying to get his teammates up.
      He was a very good student as well."

      This week, Sheldt, was preparing to post a qualifying time at the Last Chance
      meet at UH tomorrow through Sunday. The team will compete at the meet.

      "He competed in the 400 individual medley, which is one of the most brutal
      events in swimming," Anderson said.

      Sheldt was in the team's top five for the 200 fly (2:09.34, 5th), 100
      individual medley (55.81, 2nd), 200 individual medley (1:56.92, 5th), 400
      individual medley (4:12.59, 3rd), 1650 free (17:18.80, 3rd), 50 breaststroke
      (1:00.42, 4th), 200 breaststroke (2:14.31, 4th) and 50 fly (24.48, 4th).

      Mimi Goudes, who coached Sheldt for his final three seasons at Myers Park
      High School in North Carolina, called him a people magnet.

      "He had a smile that could light up a room," Goudes said. "He was a beautiful
      person and not just simply good looking. He had such a good heart and good soul.
      He made friends pretty easily."

      As a team captain of Myers Park, Sheldt led by example and never exhibited
      any health problems during swimming, Goudes said.

      "To be real honest, I don't remember the kid getting the sniffles," Goudes
      said of the state champion. "He was almost always healthy. I don't remember him
      ever getting sick.

      "He was such a leader, he would make people want to follow him," Goudes
      continued. "Teammates always seemed to do very well around him because he gave
      110 percent. You had to swim your best to keep up with him."

      The only thing Sheldt loved more than swimming was surfing, coaches said.

      That was one of the reasons why Sheldt fell in love with Hawai'i, said
      Mecklenburg Aquatic Club (N.C.) coach Patty Waldron, who coached Sheldt when he
      was 14.

      "Two words: surf's up," said Waldron when asked why Sheldt came to Hawai'i.
      "It was some place where he could combine his passion for competitive swimming
      and his love for surfing. He wanted to go there more than anything in the
      world."

      Sheldt rarely missed practice, but when he did, Waldron knew where to find
      him.

      "He would go to Wilmington, N.C., to try a little bit of surfing," Waldron
      said. "That was his real passion."

      UH president Evan Dobelle said: "I knew Mike well and he was a promising
      young athlete and scholar. His loss is personally devastating to me and I am
      struggling to make sense of a situation that has no explanation. I would like to
      extend my deepest condolences to his family, friends, fellow students and
      teammates."

      A moment of silence was held before last night's UH volleyball match and the
      same will be done at the basketball game today, UH athletic director Herman
      Frazier said. The swimming team will also honor Sheldt by dedicating the rest of
      the season to him, Anderson said.

      "This has been a very difficult time for the institution, specifically for
      our student-athletes on the swim team," Frazier said. "I told the team earlier
      today that in 25 years of being involved in athletic administration, there's
      really no manual on how to deal with this type of tragedy."

      Sheldt is survived by a younger sister, Mikaela, and parents, Mike and
      Shawnee.

      LOAD-DATE: March 7, 2003
      [/code]
      Thanks, Tim
      Forum Administrator

      Comment


      • #4
        [code] Copyright 2003 The Honolulu Advertiser (Honolulu, HI)
        All Rights Reserved
        The Honolulu Advertiser (Honolulu, HI)

        March 8, 2003 Saturday

        SECTION: SPORTS; Pg. 1D

        LENGTH: 1132 words

        HEADLINE: Swimmer's parents appreciate support

        BYLINE: Masuoka Brandon, Staff

        BODY:
        UH swim team honors late Sheldt during meet

        By Brandon Masuoka, ADVERTISER STAFF WRITER

        In the first swimming event since the drowning of 18-year-old University of
        Hawai'i swimmer Mike Sheldt, his parents yesterday thanked everyone for the
        outpouring of support for their son.

        Sheldt, of Charlotte, N.C., had an undetected heart problem that likely
        caused him to lose consciousness and drown at the start of practice on Tuesday
        at Duke Kahanamoku Aquatic Complex pool, according to the medical examiner.

        It was the first death of a UH athlete in practice or in competition in at
        least 30 years, school officials said.

        Yesterday, Sheldt's parents, Mike and Shawnee, hugged each other as the
        Hawai'i swim team honored their son at a qualifying meet with a moment of
        silence, a convocation by the Rev. Sherman Thompson, a Hawaiian chant and the
        release of colored doves that represented Sheldt's free spirit.

        The swim team also left a swimming lane vacant during the events Sheldt would
        have competed in.

        "We have been amazed by the outpouring of the aloha spirit," said Shawnee
        Sheldt. "I'm not just talking about the swim team, or just from the university
        community. This hospitality and the warmth has meant so much and has been so
        helpful. It just makes us smile."

        Dozens of well-wishers have posted messages on a website organized by
        Sheldt's former swim club, the Mecklenburg Aquatic Club (N.C.). The majority of
        the messages - some from lovestruck girls - talked about Sheldt's good looks,
        his athletic talents and his character.

        "He was always happy with a smile on his face," said Hawai'i sophomore
        teammate Nick Cabebe. "Whenever somebody was down, he would just crack a joke
        and make everybody smile. He always led the team in cheers."

        Hawai'i swim coach Mike Anderson called Sheldt an intense competitor, a
        friend and a true waterman who swam and surfed. In his tribute to Sheldt,
        Anderson urged the more than 100 people at the pool to honor Sheldt and "swim
        hard, compete well, and to yourself be true." He ended his speech with, "Let's
        roll."

        Sheldt drowned after he fainted from an undetected heart problem, said Dr.
        William Goodhue, the first deputy medical examiner who performed the autopsy on
        Sheldt.

        University of Hawai'i Athletic Director Herman Frazier said he was told
        Sheldt was underwater for "15 seconds or so" before being pulled from the pool.

        Gone too early in life

        Goodhue said Sheldt suffered from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a primary
        disease of the heart muscle, and one of the most common causes of sudden
        unexplained death in young athletes during or after physical exertion.

        Goodhue said people with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy are susceptible to
        cardiac arrhythmias, or irregular heartbeats, which can cause brief loss of
        consciousness. He said Sheldt likely sustained an irregular heartbeat while in
        the water, lost consciousness, and drowned.

        "If he had this fainting episode outside of the water, it is possible that
        the irregularity might have been severe enough that he would have died
        nonetheless," Goodhue said. "On the other hand, if the irregularity only
        resulted in transient fainting it is possible he may not have died because he
        would have been breathing air."

        Goodhue, who classified Sheldt's death as accidental, said sudden death may
        be the first sign of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Goodhue said the final autopsy
        report is pending additional laboratory and tissue studies and should be
        completed within several weeks.

        Dr. Robert Hong, a cardiologist at The Queen's Medical Center, said anyone
        who is going into competitive athletics, who has a history of passing out, chest
        pain and progressive shortness of breath, should be seen by a doctor.

        Preventing similar cases

        He said usually the evaluation would include doing a electrocardiogram, or an
        electrical monitor, and may include a soundwave study of the heart, called an
        echocardiogram, to figure out where the heart has thickened.

        When asked if additional medical screening should be done for athletes, Hong
        said there are differing opinions that take into consideration costs and other
        concerns.

        Sheldt passed his physical examination and pre-participation physical before
        the season, he did not exhibit any signs of a heart problem, and appeared to be
        in top shape, UH officials said.

        "There's four million high school athletes and 500,000 college athletes,"
        Hong said. "If you do an echo study on all of them that could potentially be a
        problem; in terms of cost factors, somebody would have to end up paying for it."

        Another problem is, according to Hong, if you subject everyone through
        overkill screening measures, "you may land up doing invasive procedures or
        potentially dangerous things for people who don't have any underlying heart
        conditions."

        Hong said new technology is being investigated with handheld echo cardio
        devices capable of performing mass screenings on athletes, but that's far from
        being a standard.

        "Even among the experts with the most experience in sports medicine, there's
        disagreement on how much routine screening should be done on athletes," Hong
        said.

        Frazier said the school does not plan on changing the current physical
        examination policy that adheres to national standards.

        "As far as we're concerned, our physicals are done similar to every other
        institution like ours throughout the country, and we will continue to do that,"
        Frazier said. "It is very, very sad for us to have to go through this. But I
        think in light of everything we've seen, in any kind of physical, (Sheldt's
        condition) would not have been detected unless you knew there was a history of
        heart problems."

        Satisfied with current policy

        Some of the Hawai'i athletes and former athletes yesterday said they were
        satisfied with the current physical examinations and trusted the UH medical
        staff to detect problems.

        "I would think (the examinations) are adequate," former University of Hawai'i
        football player Vince Manuwai said. "It's going to come down to the players to
        tell the doctors (their ailments)."

        Added Cabebe: "They're pretty much doing a good job. They check every little
        thing. They check your pulse, your heart rate, everything. It's pretty much an
        all-day physical."

        Rainbow basketball player Michael Kuebler said he hoped the physical
        examinations would detect problems, but he said he couldn't know for certain.

        "I don't really know what to say about the tests, because the same situation
        has happened in professional sports," Kuebler said. "It happened to (Reggie
        Lewis) from the Celtics. And I'm sure they do testing three times as much.

        "I really don't know what's adequate to be honest with you," Kuebler added.
        "I really don't know what is a thorough examination. You just do what
        (physicians) tell you to do."

        GRAPHIC: UH swim coach Mike Anderson, left, and athletic director Herman Frazier
        discuss Mike Sheldt's untimely death. ADVERTISER LIBRARY PHOTO * March 5, 2003

        LOAD-DATE: March 10, 2003
        [/code]
        Thanks, Tim
        Forum Administrator

        Comment


        • #5
          God Bless Mike. I do hope his family was advised to be screened.
          Our hearts break for their loss.
          Best wishes to his family and friends,
          Lisa Salberg
          President
          Knowledge is power ... Stay informed!
          YOU can make a difference - all you have to do is try!

          Dx age 12 current age 46 and counting!
          lost: 5 family members to HCM (SCD, Stroke, CHF)
          Others diagnosed living with HCM (or gene +) include - daughter, niece, nephew, cousin, sister and many many friends!
          Therapy - ICD (implanted 97, 01, 04 and 11, medication
          Currently not obstructed
          Complications - unnecessary pacemaker and stroke (unrelated to each other)

          Comment

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