If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ in HCMA Announcements. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. Your Participation in this message board is strictly voluntary. Information and comments on the message board do not necessarily reflect the feelings, opinions, or positions of the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association. At no time should participants to this board substitute information within for individual medical advice. The Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association shall not be liable for any information provided herein. All participants in this board should conduct themselves in a professional and respectful manner. Failure to do so will result in suspension or termination. The moderators of the message board working with the HCMA will be responsible for notifying participants if they have violated the rules of conduct for the board. Moderators or HCMA staff may edit any post to ensure it conforms with the rules of the board or may delete it. This community is welcoming to all those with HCM we ask that you remember each user comes to the board with information and a point of view that may differ from that which you hold, respect is critical, please post respectfully. Thank you

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Important Retraction Of Ablation Paper

Collapse

About the Author

Collapse

Lisa Salberg Find out more about Lisa Salberg
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Important Retraction Of Ablation Paper

    Posted February 10, 2003
    This editorial and letter to the editor will appear in the March 6, 2003, issue of the Journal.

    EDITORIAL
    Notice of Retraction

    G.D. Curfman, S.R. Morrissey, and J.M. Drazen
    Abstract | PDF

    CORRESPONDENCE
    Retraction: Shamim et al. Nonsurgical Reduction of the Interventricular Septum in Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy. N Engl J Med 2002;347:1326-33.
    A.J.S. Coats and Others
    Abstract | PDF

    Comments and questions? Please contact us.

    The New England Journal of Medicine is owned, published, and copyrighted © 2003 Massachusetts Medical Society. All rights reserved.


    The above was copied from the NEJM website
    More information to follow - - -
    Lisa
    Knowledge is power ... Stay informed!
    YOU can make a difference - all you have to do is try!

    Dx age 12 current age 46 and counting!
    lost: 5 family members to HCM (SCD, Stroke, CHF)
    Others diagnosed living with HCM (or gene +) include - daughter, niece, nephew, cousin, sister and many many friends!
    Therapy - ICD (implanted 97, 01, 04 and 11, medication
    Currently not obstructed
    Complications - unnecessary pacemaker and stroke (unrelated to each other)

  • #2
    n engl j med
    348;10
    www.nejm.org march
    6, 2003
    The
    new england journal
    of
    medicine
    curfman-1
    editorial
    Notice of Retraction
    Gregory D. Curfman, M.D., Stephen Morrissey, Ph.D., and Jeffrey M. Drazen, M.D.
    In a letter in the March 6, 2003, issue of the
    Journal,
    Coats et al.
    1
    request that their article, “Nonsurgical
    Reduction of the Interventricular Septum in Patients
    with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy,”
    2
    which was
    published on October 24, 2002, be retracted. The
    reason for the retraction stems from incomplete
    manuscript review by the authors and false signatures
    on submitted documents. We publish this
    editorial comment not only to inform the medical
    community but also to prevent similar situations
    from arising in the future.
    Of the eight persons named as authors of the article,
    2
    some claimed that they had never reviewed
    the original data and most claimed that they had
    not seen or approved either the original version or
    one or more of the three revised versions of the
    manuscript. One author claimed that he had seen
    neither the original data nor any version of the
    manuscript. Thus, there was an egregious disregard
    of the principles of authorship, as specified by
    the International Committee of Medical Journal
    Editors.
    3
    How did this happen? During the review process,
    several of the authors’ signatures were falsified
    by a coauthor (who later confirmed to us that he had
    done this); this falsification occurred without the
    knowledge of the purported signatories. There were
    falsified signatures on the letters of transmission
    accompanying the original and revised versions of
    the manuscript. It is never acceptable for one author
    to sign on behalf of another, even with that coauthor’s
    permission. In the matter of authorship, all
    signatures must be genuine.
    Because of the falsified signatures, we became
    aware of the situation only after the article had been
    published. Although we never proceed with our review
    of a manuscript until we have the signature of
    each of the authors, we cannot verify the authenticity
    of the signatures sent to us. We believe this to be
    a matter of basic trust between authors and editors.
    However, to prevent the problem from happening
    again, we plan to inform all authors of record by
    e-mail when their manuscript is accepted.
    We consider this breach of the principles of
    authorship a serious infraction and grounds for retracting
    the article. To their credit, when the offense
    became apparent, several of the authors of the article
    promptly communicated the facts to us and concurred
    with the need for retraction. Still, this unfortunate
    incident serves as a reminder to the medical
    community that with the privilege of authorship
    comes a mandate for personal and professional responsibility
    that must be taken very seriously. The
    key element of this responsibility is an understanding
    that the purpose of publication is to alleviate the
    suffering of those who are sick. What is published
    must therefore be completely trustworthy.
    1.
    Coats AJS, Henein M, Flather M, et al. Retraction: Shamim et al.
    Nonsurgical reduction of the interventricular septum in patients
    with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. [Retraction of Shamim W,
    Yousufuddin M, Wang D, et al. In: N Engl J Med 2002;347:1326-33.]
    N Engl J Med 2003;348.
    2.
    Shamim W, Yousufuddin M, Wang D, et al. Nonsurgical reduction
    of the interventricular septum in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.
    N Engl J Med 2002;347:1326-33.
    3.
    International Committee of Medical Journal Editors. Uniform
    requirements for manuscripts submitted to biomedical journals:
    updated October 2001. (Accessed January 21, 2003, at http://www.
    icmje.org.)
    Copyright © 2003 Massachusetts Medical Society.
    Knowledge is power ... Stay informed!
    YOU can make a difference - all you have to do is try!

    Dx age 12 current age 46 and counting!
    lost: 5 family members to HCM (SCD, Stroke, CHF)
    Others diagnosed living with HCM (or gene +) include - daughter, niece, nephew, cousin, sister and many many friends!
    Therapy - ICD (implanted 97, 01, 04 and 11, medication
    Currently not obstructed
    Complications - unnecessary pacemaker and stroke (unrelated to each other)

    Comment


    • #3
      MR1.VOL1:Nejm:NEJM:Layout:retractions:Letter
      n engl j med
      348;10
      www.nejm.org march
      6, 2003
      The
      new england journal
      of
      medicine
      coats-1
      correspondence
      Retraction: Shamim et al. Nonsurgical Reduction of the
      Interventricular Septum in Patients with Hypertrophic
      Cardiomyopathy. N Engl J Med 2002;347:1326-33.
      to the editor:
      On October 24, 2002, an article
      about septal ablation with alcohol for hypertrophic
      cardiomyopathy was published in the
      Journal
      .
      1
      The
      majority of those named as authors of the article
      did not have an opportunity to review and verify the
      data and to approve the manuscript. This unfortunate
      situation came to light when the article was
      published. In view of this irregularity in the submission
      process, we request that that paper be retracted.
      We believe that the alcohol-ablation technique described
      is a useful procedure in selected patients
      with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and other data
      support this view.
      2,3
      We also want to make clear that
      the Cleveland Clinic Foundation was not involved
      in the study but was mentioned purely as an address
      for correspondence. We hope that readers of the
      Journal
      will understand that this retraction is designed
      to maintain the integrity of the scientific
      process.
      Andrew J.S. Coats, M.D.
      Michael Henein, Ph.D.
      Marcus Flather, F.R.C.P.
      Ulrich Sigwart, M.D.
      Hubert Seggewiss, M.D.
      Duolao Wang, Ph.D.
      Mohammed Yousufuddin, M.D.
      Waqar Shamim, M.D.
      1.
      Shamim W, Yousufuddin M, Wang D, et al. Nonsurgical reduction
      of the interventricular septum in patients with hypertrophic
      cardiomyopathy. N Engl J Med 2002;347:1326-33.
      2.
      Faber L, Meissner A, Ziemessen P, Seggewiss H. Percutaneous
      transluminal septal myocardial ablation for hypertrophic obstructive
      cardiomyopathy: long term follow up of the first series of 25 patients.
      Heart 2000;83:326-31.
      3.
      Mazur W, Nagueh SF, Lakkis NM, et al. Regression of left ventricular
      hypertrophy after nonsurgical septal reduction therapy for hypertrophic
      obstructive cardiomyopathy. Circulation 2001;103:1492-6.
      Correspondence Copyright © 2003 Massachusetts Medical Society.
      Knowledge is power ... Stay informed!
      YOU can make a difference - all you have to do is try!

      Dx age 12 current age 46 and counting!
      lost: 5 family members to HCM (SCD, Stroke, CHF)
      Others diagnosed living with HCM (or gene +) include - daughter, niece, nephew, cousin, sister and many many friends!
      Therapy - ICD (implanted 97, 01, 04 and 11, medication
      Currently not obstructed
      Complications - unnecessary pacemaker and stroke (unrelated to each other)

      Comment


      • #4
        The New England Journal of Medicine yesterday retracted a published study
        because one of the co-authors forged signatures of the others saying they had
        reviewed the data when they hadn't.

        "Of the eight persons named as authors of the article, some claimed that they
        had never reviewed the original data and most claimed that they had not seen or
        approved either the original version or one or more of the three revised
        versions of the manuscript," the journal editors said.

        The article, "Nonsurgical Reduction of the Interventricular Septum in
        Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy," by Waquar Shamim and seven others
        from the Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine in London and
        elsewhere was published in the journal Oct. 24.

        The article said a nonsurgical procedure involving the use of ethanol to kill
        heart muscle in patients with cardiomyopathy - a controlled heart attack - is
        effective to relieve obstruction in selected patients.

        In its notice of retraction, the journal said it is not able to verify the
        signatures of every author, but will now e-mail all authors when a study has
        been accepted. "We consider this breach of the principles of authorship a
        serious infraction and grounds for retracting the article," the editors said.

        The journal editors said one of the researchers had later confirmed that he
        had falsified several of the signatures of his co-authors. They would not
        identify the author.

        "This unfortunate incident serves as a reminder to the medical community that
        with the privilege of authorship comes a mandate for personal and professional
        responsibility that must be taken very seriously," the editors said.

        Dr. Gregory Curfman, a journal editor, said the Imperial College is
        conducting an investigation. He said he didn't know whether the conclusions of
        the study are valid.

        LOAD-DATE: February 11, 2003
        Knowledge is power ... Stay informed!
        YOU can make a difference - all you have to do is try!

        Dx age 12 current age 46 and counting!
        lost: 5 family members to HCM (SCD, Stroke, CHF)
        Others diagnosed living with HCM (or gene +) include - daughter, niece, nephew, cousin, sister and many many friends!
        Therapy - ICD (implanted 97, 01, 04 and 11, medication
        Currently not obstructed
        Complications - unnecessary pacemaker and stroke (unrelated to each other)

        Comment


        • #5
          The Boston Herald

          February 11, 2003 Tuesday ALL EDITIONS

          SECTION: NEWS; Pg. 018

          LENGTH: 307 words

          HEADLINE: Medical journal retracts article over authors' forged signatures

          BYLINE: By MICHAEL LASALANDRA

          BODY:

          The New England Journal of Medicine yesterday retracted a published study
          because one of the co-authors forged signatures of the others saying they had
          reviewed the data when they hadn't.

          "Of the eight persons named as authors of the article, some claimed that they
          had never reviewed the original data and most claimed that they had not seen or
          approved either the original version or one or more of the three revised
          versions of the manuscript," the journal editors said.

          The article, "Nonsurgical Reduction of the Interventricular Septum in
          Patients with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy," by Waquar Shamim and seven others
          from the Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine in London and
          elsewhere was published in the journal Oct. 24.

          The article said a nonsurgical procedure involving the use of ethanol to kill
          heart muscle in patients with cardiomyopathy - a controlled heart attack - is
          effective to relieve obstruction in selected patients.

          In its notice of retraction, the journal said it is not able to verify the
          signatures of every author, but will now e-mail all authors when a study has
          been accepted. "We consider this breach of the principles of authorship a
          serious infraction and grounds for retracting the article," the editors said.

          The journal editors said one of the researchers had later confirmed that he
          had falsified several of the signatures of his co-authors. They would not
          identify the author.

          "This unfortunate incident serves as a reminder to the medical community that
          with the privilege of authorship comes a mandate for personal and professional
          responsibility that must be taken very seriously," the editors said.

          Dr. Gregory Curfman, a journal editor, said the Imperial College is
          conducting an investigation. He said he didn't know whether the conclusions of
          the study are valid.
          Knowledge is power ... Stay informed!
          YOU can make a difference - all you have to do is try!

          Dx age 12 current age 46 and counting!
          lost: 5 family members to HCM (SCD, Stroke, CHF)
          Others diagnosed living with HCM (or gene +) include - daughter, niece, nephew, cousin, sister and many many friends!
          Therapy - ICD (implanted 97, 01, 04 and 11, medication
          Currently not obstructed
          Complications - unnecessary pacemaker and stroke (unrelated to each other)

          Comment


          • #6
            Phoney article retracted
            © Health24 2000-2003. All rights reserved
            In an unusual case of ghostwriting turned on its head, one of the world's top medical journals announced last week that it was retracting an article it published last year because several listed authors said they had little or nothing to do with the research.
            The New England Journal of Medicine said that documents backing up the research contained "false signatures" from doctors who insisted they hadn't signed any such papers. Although no one could fault the science behind the study, the journal's editors said they felt compelled to retract the article anyway because falsifying signatures is a "serious infraction."

            "This unfortunate incident serves as a reminder to the medical community that with the privilege of authorship comes a mandate for personal and professional responsibility that must be taken very seriously," the editors wrote.

            A heartfelt study
            The National Heart Institute and the Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine in London, where much of the research was done, are conducting their own investigations into the breach, according to Dr Gregory Curfman, executive editor of the New England Journal of Medicine.

            The study concerned treatment of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a disease in which the heart's left ventricle enlarges, cutting off blood flow. Some patients don't respond to drugs and require surgery, but this research concluded that injecting alcohol might forestall the need for an operation in some patients.

            Signatures faked
            The article was published in the Oct. 24 issue, and Curfman said he started fielding unusual calls that very day. One came from Dr Hubert Seggewiss, a German cardiologist who was listed as one of the eight authors.

            Seggewiss said he "literally never had seen any version of the paper," Curfman related. But "there's a signature next to your name," Curfman said he told him. "He said, 'It isn't possible. I never signed anything.'"

            Seggewiss then faxed the journal his own signature, which bore no resemblance to the one that appeared on the backup documents. "We realized at that point that there was a problem," Curfman said.

            Author confessed
            The journal then contacted the remaining authors, several of whom said their signatures were falsified as well. Most claimed that they hadn't seen revised versions of the data, but one said he hadn't seen anything at all.

            Curfman declined to name the offending author, who he said quickly confessed to falsifying the signatures. His explanation "wasn't clear to me - whether it was convenient, or whether he was trying to draw in prestigious investigators," Curfman said.

            The journal is, for many doctors, a must-read publication with worldwide circulation.

            "Why did he think he'd get away with it?" Curfman said. "I don't really have a clue."

            Attempts to reach Seggewiss and two other listed authors who, according to Curfman, were not responsible - Dr Andrew Coats and Dr Mohammed Yousufuddin - were unsuccessful.

            Article scrutinised
            The article went through unusual scrutiny at the journal and was revised three times before it made its way into print, Curfman recalled. "We didn't see any fundamental flaw, as hard as we looked," he said.

            The journal subscribes to rules set by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors, which are the "gold standard" for medical periodicals. The rules state that authors must say what they contributed. "You can't sign for other people," Curfman said.

            A rare and unpleasant experience
            In some unusual cases - if a doctor were unavailable because he was game hunting in Africa, for instance - a doctor may allow someone else to sign off temporarily and he would sign it for himself later. But this case went beyond that because the signatures were done without the knowledge and permission of those named.

            The episode is rare and "not pleasant," Curfman said. "The only way that we could try to protect against this is to have handwriting experts," he added. In the future, the journal plans to e-mail the named authors and ask them to verify that they signed any documents.

            But what if a doctor leaves an institution? Most leave forwarding e-mail addresses, Curfman said. But, he allowed, "it's an imperfect world." – (HealthScout News)
            Knowledge is power ... Stay informed!
            YOU can make a difference - all you have to do is try!

            Dx age 12 current age 46 and counting!
            lost: 5 family members to HCM (SCD, Stroke, CHF)
            Others diagnosed living with HCM (or gene +) include - daughter, niece, nephew, cousin, sister and many many friends!
            Therapy - ICD (implanted 97, 01, 04 and 11, medication
            Currently not obstructed
            Complications - unnecessary pacemaker and stroke (unrelated to each other)

            Comment

            Today's Birthdays

            Collapse

            Working...
            X