If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ in HCMA Announcements. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. Your Participation in this message board is strictly voluntary. Information and comments on the message board do not necessarily reflect the feelings, opinions, or positions of the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association. At no time should participants to this board substitute information within for individual medical advice. The Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association shall not be liable for any information provided herein. All participants in this board should conduct themselves in a professional and respectful manner. Failure to do so will result in suspension or termination. The moderators of the message board working with the HCMA will be responsible for notifying participants if they have violated the rules of conduct for the board. Moderators or HCMA staff may edit any post to ensure it conforms with the rules of the board or may delete it. This community is welcoming to all those with HCM we ask that you remember each user comes to the board with information and a point of view that may differ from that which you hold, respect is critical, please post respectfully. Thank you

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

BBC Story - Drug used on mice makes hearts repair themselves

Collapse

About the Author

Collapse

Cynaburst Find out more about Cynaburst
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • BBC Story - Drug used on mice makes hearts repair themselves

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-13699711


    By James Gallagher


    More people are surviving heart attacks, but that means more are living with heart failure. A drug that makes hearts repair themselves has been used in research on mice.

    The damage caused by a heart attack had previously been considered permanent.

    But a study in the journal Nature showed the drug, thymosin beta 4, if used in advance of a heart attack, was able to "prime" the heart for repair.

    The British Heart Foundation described repair as the "holy grail of heart research", but said any treatment in humans was years away.

    Due to advances in health care the number of people dying from coronary heart disease is falling.

    But those living with heart failure are on the rise - more than 750,000 people have the condition in the UK alone.

    Wake up

    The researchers at University College London looked at a group of cells which are able to transform into different types of heart tissue in an embryo.

    In adults epicardium-derived progenitor cells line the heart, but have become dormant.

    Scientists used a chemical, thymosin beta 4, to "wake them up".

    Professor Paul Riley, from the University College London, said: "The adult epicardial cells which line the muscle of the heart can be activated, move inward and give rise to new heart muscle."

    "We saw an improvement in the ejection fraction, in the ability of the heart to pump out blood, of 25%."

    As well as pumping more blood, the scar tissue was reduced and the walls of the heart became thicker.

    Peter Weissberg, medical director of the British Heart Foundation, said he was "very excited" about the research but warned the scale of improvement seen in animals was rarely seen in humans.


    Epicardium derived progenitor cells (in red) lining the heart However, he argued that even a small improvement would have a dramatic impact on people's quality of life.

    "A normal heart has lots of spare capacity. In patients with heart failure it is working flat out just to sit down [and] it's like running a marathon," he said.

    "You could turn a patient from somebody who's gasping while sitting in a chair to somebody who can sit comfortably in a chair."

    Advance therapy

    The mice needed to take the drug in advance of a heart attack in order for it to be effective. As the researchers put it, "the priming effect is key".

    If a similar drug could be found to be effective in humans, then the researchers believe it would need to be prescribed in a similar way to statins.

    Professor Riley said "I could envisage a patient known to be at risk of a heart attack - either because of family history or warning signs spotted by their GP - taking an oral tablet, which would prime their heart so that if they had a heart attack the damage could be repaired."

    He said this could be available in 10 years.

    The British Heart Foundation, which funded the study, said repairing a damaged heart was the "holy grail" of heart research.

    The results strengthened the evidence that drugs could be used to prevent the onset of heart failure, it said.
    Daughter of Father with HCM
    Diagnosed with HCM 1999.
    Full term pregnancy - Son born 11/01
    ICD implanted 2/03; generator replaced 2/2005 and 2/2012
    Myectomy 8/11/06 - Joe Dearani - Mayo Clinic.

  • #2
    Re: BBC Story - Drug used on mice makes hearts repair themselves

    This is research does not apply to HCM as we have too many hard working cells... these people have cells that are not pumping hard enough,... for those with true DCM or a weak heart this holds promise... for those with stiff hearts and problems with the hearts ability to relax it will simply have no positive impact- in fact it could be very harmful.

    Lisa
    Knowledge is power ... Stay informed!
    YOU can make a difference - all you have to do is try!

    Dx age 12 current age 46 and counting!
    lost: 5 family members to HCM (SCD, Stroke, CHF)
    Others diagnosed living with HCM (or gene +) include - daughter, niece, nephew, cousin, sister and many many friends!
    Therapy - ICD (implanted 97, 01, 04 and 11, medication
    Currently not obstructed
    Complications - unnecessary pacemaker and stroke (unrelated to each other)

    Comment

    Today's Birthdays

    Collapse

    Working...
    X