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Push-ups/Sit-ups

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elmatt Find out more about elmatt
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  • BlueDevil
    replied
    Originally posted by Burton Borrok
    Hi there Mr. Blue,
    Somehow I get the feeling that we are all just beating around the bush on what you can and can not do. Actually it’s all a matter of common sense.

    If whatever you want to do causes angina, pain, SOB, tight chest, or any other unwanted reaction, you are generally overdoing what your own body can deal with. This puts unwanted extra strain on your heart, and can lead to all sorts of problems – both now and down the road.

    If you don’t exercise enough you lose muscle tone and generally degenerate to the point where you have trouble dealing with everyday activities.

    Now let’s get to working out with weights. A jerk and press, or dealing with heavy weights generally strains you body greatly, alternating with periods of relaxation. This is a burst type activity. Doing curls or other exercises which rely on repetitions instead of gross weight are generally quite acceptable, but you always have to remain aware of developing symptoms, both during, and for hours after the exercise. I think of the admonition – Be a Smoothie, Not a Jerk - as a good rule of thumb.

    I hope that helps clear up any outstanding questions you might have about this, but if something else is still questionable, by all means ask.
    Burt
    Thanks, Burt.

    What frustrates me a great deal is the inability to tell when fatigue is related to the HCM.

    I went to the gym pretty regularly for a two-year period (after I was cleared by the cardiologist, who put absolutely no restrictions on me, perhaps unwisely), and I found that once I got past the initial two-week hurdle, I took to it pretty well. A person needs to push oneself in order for the body to adapt and overcome, but it's hard to determine the optimum level for one with HCM. I would admit that there were times when I pushed myself a little too much, though.

    I did wear a heartrate monitor, and I noticed that over time, it would get lower with the same amount of effort. This is a good thing. I seemed to recover quickly from an increased heart rate after lifting weights. (And we're not talking about anything gargantuan here; I don't think I lifted more than 30 lbs. when working my arms).

    I see Dr. Maron next month, so I will be talking to him about all of this.

    Leave a comment:


  • michael obrien
    replied
    thanks mary and burt,I guess what you said about pushups mary makes sense.It would be like lifting weights its just that I havent done one in so long.I was wondering what would happen.I think the light free weights is the way to go thanks mike

    Leave a comment:


  • Burton Borrok
    replied
    Hi there Mr. Blue,
    Somehow I get the feeling that we are all just beating around the bush on what you can and can not do. Actually it’s all a matter of common sense.

    If whatever you want to do causes angina, pain, SOB, tight chest, or any other unwanted reaction, you are generally overdoing what your own body can deal with. This puts unwanted extra strain on your heart, and can lead to all sorts of problems – both now and down the road.

    If you don’t exercise enough you lose muscle tone and generally degenerate to the point where you have trouble dealing with everyday activities.

    OK, so now we apply general experience to the picture. Burst type activities (running a dash, basketball, soccer, sprinting, competitive sports, etc.) are very much more apt to cause an unwanted cardiac reaction and may in fact precipitate SCD, so they should be avoided.

    Worming up and cooling down from long, smooth exercises are to be encouraged as they tend to not precipitate trouble while improving your muscle tone considerably. This type of activity also helps control weight and generally promotes good feelings.

    Activities such as swimming, scuba, boat racing, horseback trail riding, and other activities which would make getting immediate help difficult; or activities where you can not stop immediately with the onset of symptoms are to be avoided because of the unnecessary additional risks involved.

    Now let’s get to working out with weights. A jerk and press, or dealing with heavy weights generally strains you body greatly, alternating with periods of relaxation. This is a burst type activity. Doing curls or other exercises which rely on repetitions instead of gross weight are generally quite acceptable, but you always have to remain aware of developing symptoms, both during, and for hours after the exercise. I think of the admonition – Be a Smoothie, Not a Jerk - as a good rule of thumb.

    I hope that helps clear up any outstanding questions you might have about this, but if something else is still questionable, by all means ask.
    Burt

    Leave a comment:


  • BlueDevil
    replied
    Originally posted by shirleymahoney
    You know everyone is different, I would ask your doctor, it is really hard to tell you you can when we don't know your situation i hope that makes sence
    There's that, but if I remember rightly from the HCM book, there is the option of cardiac rehabilitation. I gathered that it is sort of physical therapy for those with heart ailments. I want to look into that option myself because, like I said above, I want to be as active as I can be. I get really bored with walking, whether it's on a treadmill or not.

    Leave a comment:


  • shirleymahoney
    replied
    You know everyone is different, I would ask your doctor, it is really hard to tell you you can when we don't know your situation i hope that makes sence

    Shirley

    Leave a comment:


  • Toogoofy317
    replied
    I would probably say no. Because, a traditional push-up uses the same mechanics as pressing weights. Esp, if you are going for the timed ones because its not aerobic at that point. You may be better just using lighter freeweights with more repetitions to get the desired effect.

    Mary S.

    Leave a comment:


  • michael obrien
    replied
    hi everyone just curious can we do pushups please reply I have been wondering about this for some time now thanks all mike

    Leave a comment:


  • Linda
    replied
    Matt, Welcome to the site. I hope you having a speedy and uncomplicated recovery from the ICD implant. We'll look forward to hearing more from you when you are ready. Linda

    Leave a comment:


  • BlueDevil
    replied
    Re: Push-ups/Sit-ups

    Originally posted by elmatt
    I realize weight lifting can be dangerous for people with HCM; however what about push-ups and sit-ups? I would like to keep some degree of muscle tone and thought this might be a way to do it without "weight lifting."
    I am having the same issues as you are with regard to exercise. I want to develop some flexibility and muscle tone -- both of which I currently lack. At this time, I'm under evaluation by the MHI, and this is an issue I will be addressing with them once all the cards are on the table. I don't want to be too limited if I don't have to be. I don't want to be resigned to a life of treadmills and walking.

    There has got to be something for HCMers who can tolerate exercise that will enable them to develop flexibility and muscle tone.

    That said, a friend of mine suggested yoga. I am willing to give it a go, but I have to ask the doctors about it first. I'm also keen on water aerobics. I tried it once and took to it pretty well for the most part (the HCM wasn't so much a bother as my flat feet were).

    -- Tim

    Leave a comment:


  • Burton Borrok
    replied
    Hi Elmatt,
    Welcome to the site – and you are more then welcome here. This place is loaded with information, you can ask questions (as you just did), talk to our resident expert (Lisa), blow off steam when the pressure gets too high, add comments to another’s post, and ‘hang out’ with a great bunch of people. We’re glad to have you.

    Now, about your question on exercising. In a nutshell, certain types of exercise are of benefit to you, and some types of exercise can be harmful. What you want to look for is the long, smooth, sustained exercises, and avoid the ‘burst’ exercises where the activity level fluctuates dramatically. Swimming (with a buddy) is good if you’re doing something like swimming laps casually - and bad if you are racing. Biking in the park (smoothly, on level ground) is good; going up and down hills is bad. Got the picture?

    One of the real keys is to stop and rest if you develop symptoms, and to not start ‘pushing the envelop.’ If a certain activity generally leads to symptoms, avoid it - even if it is not what you would consider a ‘burst’ type activity. You would be surprised at how much you can build yourself up without resorting to strenuous exertions.
    Burt

    Leave a comment:


  • elmatt
    started a topic Push-ups/Sit-ups

    Push-ups/Sit-ups

    I realize weight lifting can be dangerous for people with HCM; however what about push-ups and sit-ups? My doctor gave me the O.K. for Cardio but said weight lifting was not a good idea. I was recently diagnosed with HCM and am in my early 30's. I would like to keep some degree of muscle tone and thought this might be a way to do it without "weight lifting." Any input would be appreciated. Thanks. By the way, I have passed out once (only once) and was fitted with an AICD about 3 weeks ago. My AICD is new (Medtronic Maximo DR 7278) so it has the SMART technology. Also, my limits are set high (220) before it administers therapy. Any input would be appreciated.

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