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Stress and HOCM

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  • Stress and HOCM

    Hi all,

    I delved somewhat deeper in the mechanisms around decompensatio cordis, more commonly known as heart failure. I've always been puzzled by the name of it, 'till i read that the 'decompensatio' means that normal body reactions - compensations - for a less than adequate bloodsupply are no longer able to cope.

    It was quite enlighting to learn that one of the reactions is an increase in stresshormones (noradrenalin) Up 'till then, i've always assumed that i'm a rather stress and disturbance sensitive person, and able to react a bit uhm, how shall we say, 'uncomposed' at times.

    But, surprise, the regular dose of beta blocker i'm taking now seems to restore heart function so well that compensation is no longer that strong - meaning less stresshormone, meaning a quiter life

    Does anyone have the same experience? Do you (all) underwrite my in strenuous thinking :P born conclusion that stress sensitivity may be a plague to us because of this compensatory mechanism? (I'm not solliciting the Nobel prize )

    Ad

    PS Pam, regarding your testing negative for the 'dutch' gene, i didn't know Canada was 'American' to What is it that you hoped for it was this gene instead of maybe something else?
    \"Hope is disappointment postponed\"

    Dx in 2004, first symptoms 20 years ago? Obstructed, A-fib, family history!

    Combined Morrow and (left atrial) Maze procedures & PVI at St. Antonius Hospital, Netherlands, March 28, 2013.

    Meds (past) propranolol, metoprolol, disopyramide, sotalol, amiodaron, aspirin, dabigatran, acenocoumarol.

    Meds (current) sotalol, dabigatran, furosemide.

  • #2
    Ad, I can't say absolutely that we are talking about the same thing but I do know that I was tested for a gene that has been found in descendants of Frisian mennonites.
    My family history is a bit sketchy on one side and although the geneticist figured it to be a long shot, he figured I had enough coincidences to make it worth testing me, so I took it. Hope this clears things up for you.

    Pam
    It's not what you gather, but what you scatter that tells what kind of life you have lived.

    Dx in Feb/99. Obstructed. No ICD, no surgeries, no family history. 2 sons ages 14 and 6.

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    • #3
      Now to reply to this specific post, I too have noticed similar, but was not sure why. When my Beta Blocker was a higher dose(125mg I think), I felt really good, and calm. But then the high dose started giving me weird arrythmias(and low BP) so the dose had to be lowered. I did fine for a while, but then I began having panic attacks and could not handle stress at all. I made no connection until just recently when I learned BB's are sometimes given for anxiety. I always assumed I was crazy, as I didn't know anyone who reacted to stress the way I did.

      Take Care,
      Pam
      It's not what you gather, but what you scatter that tells what kind of life you have lived.

      Dx in Feb/99. Obstructed. No ICD, no surgeries, no family history. 2 sons ages 14 and 6.

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      • #4
        Wow, what an interesting idea! I have also been somewhat of an over-reactor, I think, although there were some areas such as my own health where I was an under-reactor. I credited it to hormones, female ones, that is. Since I was diagnosed and put on beta blockers at about the same time as I went through menopause, I assumed that my calmer state was due to the loss of hormones. Reading your post makes me realize that it may be due to the beta blockers.

        Thanks for an interesting hypothesis.

        Rhoda

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        • #5
          Pam,

          I think you have indeed been tested for the gene i mentioned in my earlier post.

          As for the stress levels, BB's are indeed known as some kind of 'wonder medicine' for a number of ailments. Given the interdependencies between autonomous bodily functions, i think your anxiety may very well be attributable to a lesser suppression of compensatory mechanisms.

          BB's also seem to have some effects on the autonomous nervous system, which among other things regulates our basic readiness level, with BB's putting our bodily gears into lower gear. Note that BB's are considered doping in a number of sports, most notably shooting sports

          BB's are very dosage sensitive. That's probably why my treating HCM specialist didn't react to my previous cardiologist prescribing BB's to be used only during palpitations.

          Ad
          \"Hope is disappointment postponed\"

          Dx in 2004, first symptoms 20 years ago? Obstructed, A-fib, family history!

          Combined Morrow and (left atrial) Maze procedures & PVI at St. Antonius Hospital, Netherlands, March 28, 2013.

          Meds (past) propranolol, metoprolol, disopyramide, sotalol, amiodaron, aspirin, dabigatran, acenocoumarol.

          Meds (current) sotalol, dabigatran, furosemide.

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          • #6
            Side note:

            Beta Blockers are used in some cases to combat stage fright.

            FYI

            Lisa
            Knowledge is power ... Stay informed!
            YOU can make a difference - all you have to do is try!

            Dx age 12 current age 46 and counting!
            lost: 5 family members to HCM (SCD, Stroke, CHF)
            Others diagnosed living with HCM (or gene +) include - daughter, niece, nephew, cousin, sister and many many friends!
            Therapy - ICD (implanted 97, 01, 04 and 11, medication
            Currently not obstructed
            Complications - unnecessary pacemaker and stroke (unrelated to each other)

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            • #7
              Well, Lisa, Is that why you're such a great public speaker? No, I know it just comes naturally. Linda

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              • #8
                Yeah , I agree with all of the above. Working previously in the psych field at a clinic, we often used beta blockers to stabilize labile mood type people. You know the kind, talking calm and then whamm full throttle. Some people with mood disorders can be dealt with quite nicely with beta blockers.

                To note I am much better composed and less tangentile in my thought processes on beta blocker treatment for my heart. However , it is no longer satisfying to be able to argue when the occasion arises. I have not the desire or the umf to give it my all. I think in contrast I become disengaged too easily with the high doses. I quess there has to be compromises to benefit the heart.

                Pam
                Dx @ 47 with HOCM & HF:11/00
                Guidant ICD:Mar.01, Recalled/replaced:6/05 w/ Medtronic device
                Lead failure,replaced 12/06.
                SF lead recall:07,extracted leads and new device 2012
                [email protected] Tufts, Boston:10/5/03; age 50. ( [email protected] 240 mmHg ++)
                Paroxysmal A-Fib: 06-07,2010 controlled w/sotalol dosing
                Genetic mutation 4/09, mother(d), brother, son, gene+
                Mother of 3, grandma of 3:Tim,27,Sarah,33w/6 y/o old Sophia, 5 y/o Jack, Laura 34, w/ 5 y/o old Benjamin

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