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DHF or CHF ?

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Eileen2345 Find out more about Eileen2345
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  • DHF or CHF ?

    Hi everyone

    When I spoke with my doctor and the cardiac nurse about the SOB while lying down and how eating something salty makes me short of breath and the everyday fluid retention (about 3 pounds) and the complete exhaustion, on and on.... they said that my condition is diastolic heart failure, it is not exactly CHF.

    They said that because I have HOCM and my EF is so high (it's 84%) and that my septum is thick (2.7cm) that I have diastolic heart failure. They said that it comes from the diastolic side of the heart not from the systolic.

    From what I have read on the internet the systolic failure has a low ejection fraction and diastolic failure has a high ejection fraction.

    The cardiologist and the nurse said that the diastolic heart failure symptoms are still the same as in congestive heart failure.

    Does anyone here have a low ejection fraction and have HCM or HOCM?
    Any thoughts on this?

    Does anyone know how much reasearchers know about diastolic heart failure?

    Thank you for any information, I appreciate it.

    Hugs -- Eileen
    49 yrs. old
    Diagnosed at 31.
    Cardiac Arrest 2003, RF Ablation in AZ, no positive result -
    First ICD 2003 - In 2006 lead went bad, abandoned lead, threaded new one & new generator
    Myectomy 5-5-05 at The Cleveland Clinic - Dr. Lever & Dr. Smedira -heart surgeon.
    Currently have Grade 2 Diastolic Dysfunction with pulmonary hypertension & pulmonary edema.
    My brother passed away suddenly at 34 yrs old from HCM.
    2 teenage children, ages 17 and 15.

  • #2
    Re: DHF or CHF ?

    Eileen

    Doc said the same thing to me but it is still heart failure and it is treated the same way, you know it is just as dangerous to have a too high EF as it is to have a low EF, well off to take more meds i have to go take my Spironolactone

    Shirley
    Diagnosed 2003
    Myectomy 2-23-2004
    Husband: Ken
    Son: John diagnosed 2004
    Daughter: Janet (free of HCM)

    Grandchildren: Drew 15,Aaron 13,Karen 9,Connor 9

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    • #3
      Re: DHF or CHF ?

      Well, I'm not sure if I'm in falure ot not (having another echo done) but my EF is in the 90's and I feel SOB all the time (mostly when lying down flat and after having a big meal). As a matter of fact, I can feel SOB for no reaon sometimes. I do that that I have decreased distolic function.

      Wish you all the very best,

      Nigel
      I cannot fear death, because when dead, death does not exist. Love is the reason for being, it can never be taken away nor lost, so hold on I will, and in death I will not part, but rejoice for the time I’ve had with you.

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      • #4
        Re: DHF or CHF ?

        Yes, Eileen,

        That is what most of us mean when we say we have CHF. Most HCMers have a high ejection fraction and in some this leads to fluid retention. The cause is different, but the result is pretty much the same and the strain on the heart is the same.

        Doc told me the same thing. I felt that he was saying it was not so significant for us, but others have said that it is and that it is still essential to get rid of the fluid. I wish I had more success at this. I was up 7 times last night because of fluid storage during the day.

        Rhoda

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        • #5
          Re: DHF or CHF ?

          Thank you everyone for clearing this up for me.

          I appreciate all the information.

          Hugs to All

          Eileen
          49 yrs. old
          Diagnosed at 31.
          Cardiac Arrest 2003, RF Ablation in AZ, no positive result -
          First ICD 2003 - In 2006 lead went bad, abandoned lead, threaded new one & new generator
          Myectomy 5-5-05 at The Cleveland Clinic - Dr. Lever & Dr. Smedira -heart surgeon.
          Currently have Grade 2 Diastolic Dysfunction with pulmonary hypertension & pulmonary edema.
          My brother passed away suddenly at 34 yrs old from HCM.
          2 teenage children, ages 17 and 15.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: DHF or CHF ?

            This was a rather good write up on the topic.

            http://www.diagnosisheart.com/showar...?articleid=164
            What is Diastolic Dysfunction?


            by Marat Reyzelman
            Posted: November 16, 2004


            Summary:


            Diastolic dysfunction is a term sometimes used by physicians to describe a type of heart failure (also referred to as right-sided failure or high-output failure). By definition patients with diastolic dysfunction have the symptoms and signs of heart failure but are able to maintain a normal ejection fraction. That means that the heart is able to maintain an appropriate force of contraction needed to supply blood and oxygen to the tissues. However, the heart in diastolic failure is unable to relax properly in order to accommodate the filling of the heart chambers with blood. This results in increased pressures within the cardiac chambers which eventually leads to the symptoms and complications of this condition. The symptoms of diastolic heart failure are often difficult to differentiate from those of systolic heart failure, but the mechanisms leading to each are often different.

            What causes diastolic dysfunction?

            The mechanisms responsible for diastolic dysfunction are complex and influenced by other comorbid diseases. It is now known that patients with hypertension and coronary artery disease are strong risk factors for diastolic dysfunction and failure. Other more rare disorders such as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy also put patients at risk for this condition.

            What are the symptoms of this disorder?

            Just like with congestive or systolic heart failure, patients with diastolic failure suffer from symptoms resulting from pulmonary congestion and fluid overload. These typically manifest themselves in the form of shortness of breath, inability to lie down flat without difficulty breathing, nocturnal cough, and swelling of the feet and ankles. Patients may also notice distention of the veins in the neck. Some may notice significant weight gain.

            How is diastolic dysfunction diagnosed?

            Most physicians use a set of criteria from the patient history as well as physical exam in order to diagnose diastolic heart failure. Along with the symptoms mentioned above, doctors use echocardiography to measure the ejection fraction (the proportion of the blood in the heart chamber being pumped out with each heart beat). Physicians also check for murmurs, arrhythmias, high blood pressure and other forms of heart disease that may predispose patients to this disorder.

            What is the treatment and prognosis for diastolic dysfunction?

            Like patients with congestive heart failure, patients with diastolic failure benefit from fluid reduction via the use of diuretics. These also help to reduce blood pressure, a common comorbidity. Other medications used to treat diastolic dysfunction include calcium-channel blockers, beta-blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, and many others. Reported annual mortality rates for patients with diastolic heart failure vary from 1.3% to 17.5% compared with 15% to 20% for patients with systolic heart failure.

            What can I do to prevent this disease?

            As a patient, vigilant control of known risk factors for cardiac disease such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, smoking and obesity can help you to maintain a healthy heart and a healthy lifestyle. Dietary modifications, exercise regimens, and annual examinations with your physician can delay and prevent complications of heart disease.
            Knowledge is power ... Stay informed!
            YOU can make a difference - all you have to do is try!

            Dx age 12 current age 46 and counting!
            lost: 5 family members to HCM (SCD, Stroke, CHF)
            Others diagnosed living with HCM (or gene +) include - daughter, niece, nephew, cousin, sister and many many friends!
            Therapy - ICD (implanted 97, 01, 04 and 11, medication
            Currently not obstructed
            Complications - unnecessary pacemaker and stroke (unrelated to each other)

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            • #7
              Thank you Lisa for posting this. This is good information to know, this answers more questions than the cardiologist did. I wish I visited this site years ago.
              49 yrs. old
              Diagnosed at 31.
              Cardiac Arrest 2003, RF Ablation in AZ, no positive result -
              First ICD 2003 - In 2006 lead went bad, abandoned lead, threaded new one & new generator
              Myectomy 5-5-05 at The Cleveland Clinic - Dr. Lever & Dr. Smedira -heart surgeon.
              Currently have Grade 2 Diastolic Dysfunction with pulmonary hypertension & pulmonary edema.
              My brother passed away suddenly at 34 yrs old from HCM.
              2 teenage children, ages 17 and 15.

              Comment

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