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Afib

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meggy8868 retired teacher; had my first echo which indicated HCM in 1999 but was not told I had the condition. Find out more about meggy8868
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  • mbcube
    replied
    Re: Afib

    AD - The device is called a watchman here in the US - Here is a link:
    http://www.bostonscientific.com/en-E...re-device.html

    Leave a comment:


  • Ad
    replied
    Re: Afib

    Well, let me chime in from my own perspective (which, not being an MD, is the only thing I can offer).

    Yes, anticoagluation is required. Until 2012, I had a relaxed attitude about it despite my cardiologist pressing me to go on coumarin. Mid 2012 I had a TIA, 30 minutes and it was away with no lasting damage (I guess, it's all working still), but the warning was not lost on me. Together with my myectomy I had a Cox-Maze done which, among other things, also removes the left atrial appendage. It's this little side lobe of the LA where bloodclots are most likely to form. Statistically, it's as effective as coumarin! I still take dabigatran, so stroke is quite unlikely even if I'm in Afib (still happens, but less then before). There is an experimental procedure using catheters to close of the LAA, if you cannot take coumarin or dabigatran. Look at www.antoniusziekenhuis.nl (guess its only dutch, but somewhere the procedure is described).

    Also, Afib became easier on me after removal of the obstruction. So the myectomy part went well. Disopyramide besides lessening the obstruction may also work somewhat against the Afib. Having had Afib for the past 15 years and it surviving the most effective treatment so far it reckon it's here to stay, as a side effect of mainly the obstruction I had for so long.
    Last edited by Ad; 02-01-2015, 06:25 PM.

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  • carolinaviking
    replied
    Re: Afib

    Sorry, I am obviously late to this discussion, but I have some things that "seem" to have helped me. When you hear one of them you may think I am nuts though.

    First off, from my experience(11 events in last 10 weeks, with 9 of those this month), there isn't any pattern to it. Some were during the day, most were when I was asleep. Some were preceded by ever increasing palpitations, and some started up out of nowhere. Some create incredible pain, and some are pain free. 3 of them put me in the hospital, 1 converted in the ER 15 minutes after I had an ECG verifying that I was in a-fib with a pulse of 150, the rest converted at home. My job involves a lot of finding patterns in things that don't appear to have patterns, and a-fib drives me nuts in that regard.

    As far as getting myself out of a-fib? I noticed that 2 different times as I was sitting in the car waiting to go to the ER as my wife moved the truck out of the driveway, and was loading the CPAP, bag of clothes, and her crocheting into the car I converted sitting there. Both times the temperature was in the mid teens. I mentioned this to my EP's PA, and he said that extreme cold does shock some people out of A-fib. Some people can valsalva themselves and will come out of it.

    My current (Dr. given) protocol is to check my BP, depending on my systolic number take 3 or 4 meds, wait an hour, if I am still in pain and my BP is still okay, take another half dose of one of the meds. Wait another hour, and if I am still in a-fib with pain, go to the ER.

    So where is the "crazy" part? Based on the cold seeming to "shock" me out of it a couple times, after I have given the meds at least 45 minutes to work, I get in the shower and turn on the cold water full force in my face for about 45 seconds. It is as horrible as it sounds, but it has brought me out of a-fib twice.

    I've had pediatric nurses tell me that they try wash clothes soaked in ice water on kids faces to get them out of a-fib and several of the a-fib sites mention plunging your face in ice water to stop an event.

    Definitely talk to your doctors before you try this.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jall
    replied
    Re: Afib

    sleep apnea is also a big trigger of afib. One theory is that when you get oxygen starved from an obstruction in the larynx, you get a shot of adrenaline which then triggers a faster heart rate and then the afib. What ever the exact mechanism, sleep apnea is certainly connected to afib.

    Leave a comment:


  • mbcube
    replied
    Re: Afib

    I was told by an ER Doc (don't ask) that its really very logical when you think of it. While sleeping, all your systems slow to a crawl. Depending on other things that initiate a sudden change in your heartbeat - could be a dream, a pvc, hiccup even - our hearts just don't have the "cat-like" reflexes to be able to respond as they should. This could be the trigger to an "event."

    Leave a comment:


  • Hugh W
    replied
    Re: Afib

    Originally posted by meggy8868 View Post
    Just some miscellaneous questions. Is irregular heart beat greater during sleep?
    Meggy I can think of four different occasions that my afib acted up while I was sleeping to a point where it caused me to wake up. This occurrence is very irregular for me and I could not pin it down to anything that I had eaten or done during that day. Holter test's have not picked up anything abnormal but I have not had an occurrence sever enough to wake me up while I have been on a Holter.

    Similarly I have had three occurrences of crushing pain in my left side ribs that matches my heart beat. No explanation on why this has occurred. Frequency on this appears to be related to changes in my verapamil dosage.

    As a person that works in an precise environment not having everything tracked down to a cause was frustrating.
    Last edited by Hugh W; 01-06-2015, 12:02 AM. Reason: typo

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  • meggy8868
    replied
    Re: Afib

    Thanks to you all for responding. Yes, Cynaburst, I am pro-active medically. I am changing my attitude but will persevere with trying to get medical treatment. I love my EP doc because of his humility and he studies the records instead of just a cold walk into the office. So I wrote to him and explained that I couldn't get in and asked about what to do now after the ER and prior to appointment. he immediately got me into his NPractioner and she says that he often sneaks a "walk-in" while there.
    I asked about the "pill in the pocket" regime that was on the John M website. Very interesting about the ginger. As I can have bad stomach pains from aspirin or some foods and ginger is the one thing that I can take besides hydrocodone that calms stomach pain and esophageal pain, so I will definitely bring that subject up. also vit E. Aspirin regime is just out for me. Dr. John M doesn't like the idea of that mixed with warfarin. Love that guy, what a witty fellow and I found myself laughing out loud reading his articles. Yes, I will not avoid medical care for sure, but my new attitude is helping. Before I was just waiting for the other shoe to drop. And when I read from John M that strong emotions can cause Afib, I knew I wasn't crazy. I nearly walked out of the movie Unbroken because it was so powerful. Not that I wasn't enjoying it immensely, it is just that strong enjoyment gives my chest and heart about as much of a problem as anything else. Two seats away from me was my primary doc and his wife. I kept sneaking peaks at him cause one is always interested in what the wife is like, curiosity. Then, I thought, I can't cause a scene in the movie with Afib and have him there to misjudge me as always, thinks everything is in my head. I will ask the question too as to why do these events happen during sleep or after just awakening from a nap if stress is the culprit, shouldn't I have less stress while sleeping? Just some miscellaneous questions. Is irregular heart beat greater during sleep?

    Leave a comment:


  • I am Darlene
    replied
    Re: Afib

    When my symptoms increased well before my scheduled appointment at Cleveland Clinic, I called to see if they had any cancelizations (sp?) for me to move my appointment sooner. I was told that they didn't but If my symptoms got too bad I could do some sort of on-line request to be seen within 24 hours. Maybe the COE that you have an appointment at has something similar? Or maybe you should consider trying to make an appointment at a different COE altogether. With what you are experiencing, I'd want to be seen ASAP by a COE. Surely if one of them knew what you were experiencing, they'd get you in quickly.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hugh W
    replied
    Re: Afib

    Meggy as others have said it is important to discuss all options with your cardiologist. I am in continuous afib, self-regulating. I do not have troubles the majority of the time but there are days that it is difficult to function and I cannot do my exercise routines. I am on Xareleto.

    The surprise to be was a supplement that I use when I have a cold coming on. I take natural ginger. I did not realize that ginger should not be taken when a person is on an anti-coagulant drug as ginger acts as a natural blood thinner. I never thought to bring ginger up with the cardiologist until I started having small re-occurring nose bleeds when I had my most recent cold.

    Best to discuss all supplements and if there is any cross impacts with your cardiologist.

    All the best on getting this under control.

    Leave a comment:


  • mbcube
    replied
    Re: Afib

    Meggy - I personally believe that attitude is vital and is an equal component in recovery.

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  • Cynaburst
    replied
    Re: Afib

    Meggy - Noone here is in a position to advise you what to do besides making it a priority to see an EP and get proper anticoagulation and treatment.

    Strokes are nothing to mess around with.

    My dad had his first massive stroke when I was a child cause he didn't know he was in afib. He took coumadin for another 30 years until he died following another one when they took him off prior to a hip replacement which he never had because of the stroke. He had a few TIAs in the middle. He was not proactive enough about his own medical care, and it made him first disabled, and then cost him his life.

    It is up to you to make your own health care a priority and get the proper care. I hope that you are able to do that. I understand that it is difficult, and that there are obstacles. I get that. I also have a very complicated medical history and many things to worry about. But it is not impossible and requires you to follow up with the doctors and push the envelope for your own care.

    Good luck to you.

    Leave a comment:


  • JillC
    replied
    Re: Afib

    That's great Meggy.... Doing all you can for yourself with diet and exercise is good. However, don't forget, God created Cardiologists and Pharmaceuticals too.
    Last edited by JillC; 01-04-2015, 04:24 PM.

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  • meggy8868
    replied
    Re: Afib

    Hi folks: Well today I awakened with a brand new attitude and fighting spirit as in " I am mad as **** and not going to take it anymore." For those who remember that old movie. Well after being inspired by Dr. John M and reading his articles I have decided to take control. No more sugar, caffeine, refined foods and every day I walk, I don't care if it is 20 below; we know how to dress here at the North Pole. Also read the the Words of life in the Bible and felt life pouring into me. I will continue to be pro-active and not afraid. Dr. John talked about the big hammers the big treatments for AFIB which may do more harm than good. I will control what I can and what I can't put into the hands of God but NO more fear of the unknown. Exercised today and ate healthy, a good first start.

    Leave a comment:


  • gfox42
    replied
    Re: Afib

    One big problem with the "natural" anticoagulants is that you don't get a measured dose - sometimes you get way too much, and sometimes way too little.

    Gordon

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  • Jall
    replied
    Re: Afib

    Sorry, I don't know anything about natural anti-coagulant options. They do push taking the new generation anti-coagulants at night right after dinner to minimize the stomach issues that some have. You might check out at website called stopafib.org and search for an option. Lots of people there are very expierenced with afib issues.

    Leave a comment:

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