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annamc Find out more about annamc
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  • Rich Miller
    replied
    Re: Disability

    Anna ,I am glad for you. I go on Tues the 8th for my hearing ,wish me well Rich

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  • Lisa Salberg
    replied
    Not likely on an EKG report - Normally these reports kick out computer driven information on the top of likely diagnosis..they are more often wrong then right in HCM... I would not read it from the actual EKG...ask the doctor what he found in the EKG.
    Lisa

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  • Reenie
    replied
    Could it be "bi" ventricular hypertrophy? That would mean both ventricles are thickened.

    Reenie

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  • Sarah
    replied
    sorry

    ECG print outs are computer-driven, so it is spewing all the things it thinks it sees, which confirms (for me, anyway) that the "B" was not a part of the diagnosis. I would have to see the whole report to think otherwise.

    s

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  • Sarah
    replied
    hm

    Dear Anna,

    Are you reading that from a report? Are you sure there isn't something labeled "A. blah blah" before it?

    Ventricular Hypertrophy is when the lower chamber(s) of your heart is too thick. Left ventricular hypertrophy and septal wall hypertrophy are the specific kinds of ventricular hypertrophy you will see in HCM (among others).

    I have never heard of "B. Ventricular Hypertrophy" which is why I think the "B" is indicating a secondary diagnosis and not a part of the actual diagnosis.

    Feel free to call Lisa at 973-983-7429 to go over your records in private if you prefer. She is in the office today.

    Take care,

    S

    Leave a comment:


  • Linda
    replied
    Anna, Wow, this is really a long-running thread in a short time! It's been a few days since I've been on the message board, so I've read the whole thread today. The disability/SSD concerns are common to so many who read this board, and you will probably get some good info and suggestions, but I'm not sure that's the best place for you to begin. It may be very helpful for you to call Lisa in the HCMA office and discuss your HCM, symptoms, treatment, etc with her in confidence. She can give you info about HCM treatment centers, & who may be able to help you a great deal. If you are able to improve management of the condition, you may very well have more options open to you for work opportunities. I hope you will try this approach, and I wish you well. Linda

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  • Lisa Salberg
    replied
    Thank you for the correction.. I was refering to Social Security Disability Income.
    Lisa

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  • kathyn2
    replied
    Just to keep it straight....SSD is the program that is based on your work record and your payment will be based on how much you paid into the system and how much money you made etc.

    SSI is a needs based program for people that have very little assets and they don't have enough credits in their work record to qualify for SSD. The amounts I listed in my message above were for SSI for poor people that don't have a good enough work record. Also, some people get both SSD (ssdi) and SSI if their ssd is not equal to the ssi payment in their state it will be supplemented to that amount (hence SSI = supplemental security income).

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  • Lisa Salberg
    replied
    SSI amounts are also based upon your lifetime earns. Each year it is a good idea to request a statement from SS to check to see that your earnings have been assigned to your SS # it will also tell you things like - what your DI payments will be, what your death benefit is for your children, what your spouses benefits are and what your estimated retirement benefits will be at various retirment ages.
    If you have had a good paying job, then your income is higher, if you have not been able to maintain employment, then it is not going to be very high. This is an area where stay at home moms have a big problem...as they may have gone for years without a Paying job...but worked harder then anyother job in their lives...
    Lisa

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  • kathyn2
    replied
    Even SSI doesn't pay much. For most stated it is around $500 a month more or less. Some states subsidize it. Calif. has the highest SSI at around 760 a month but it gives no other help. No food stamps and no rent help etc. Other states only give the $500 to $550 amount but they give food stamps and some other help. Gainful employment for SSDI is around $800 a month now. If they think you can make $800 a month then you don't qualify. Where I live you literally cannot even rent a room for $500 a month. Maybe for $700 a month but that leaves you nothing for food or anything else. It really is a mess. It makes people on these programs have to sneak money etc. Work a bit under the table if you can find it or live with a mess of people to try and get by. It really is such a shame.

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  • mtlieb
    replied
    Anna,

    Sorry, i also wanted to address Sarah's comment concerning privately run organizations that may help. I am currently getting my prescriptions filled through a local clinic, privately run, that dispenses samples of medications to those without prescription coverage. It's like a pharmacy. I take my prescription into them, and they fill it using free samples they've obtained from pharmaceutical companies. I just got 8 weeks worth of Toprol-XL from them, which i understand is a rather expensive drug.

    It took a lot of research and hard work to find out all of these things, but it's worth it. Just remember, there are many organizations out there to help you, both government and privately run, but you have to do your homework.

    Jim

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  • mtlieb
    replied
    Anna,

    I'm not sure where you live, but many states are using their tobacco settlement money to provide low-cost health insurance for those who don't have it. Pennsylvania is one of these, and they offer a program called Adult Basic which provides coverage for 30 dollars a month. It's not medicaid, you pay your own small premium, but it's not high-risk either, which can cost upwards of 500 dollars. There's no clause preventing treatment for pre-existing condition with the PA program.

    Please look into your own state's programs. You wouldn't believe how many programs that are available that most of us don't even know about.

    Take Care,

    Jim

    Leave a comment:


  • Lisa Salberg
    replied
    NO that does not seem very fair... but this is what they are looking for. If you are able to work to some degree you may be eligible for state aid to assist with medical care, food and other basic needs. SSI is for complete care. There are services available state to state that vary and you would need to contact social services in your area to see if you qualify for benefits.
    SSI is for those who are completely disable. It is hard to get for most.

    Lisa

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  • Sarah
    replied
    be poor

    Sadly, the US is the only developed nation that doesn't have a living minimum wage or national healthcare or enough social services to ensure people who can only do some work can live a decent standard of living.

    There may be private charities in your community that can help fill the gap, but there is nothing the government does uniformly to bridge the gaps for you.

    No good answer for you, but the only one I have.

    S

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  • pickaback
    replied
    Can you stand? Can you walk? can you do basic functions such as read, grab, move, and such... These are the issues that will be evaluated. If you are able to work part time hours that is good enough for SSI to turn down a claim.
    This I do not understand. If a person can work part-time and cannot afford to support themselves, what are they do to?

    Leave a comment:

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