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Lisa Salberg Find out more about Lisa Salberg
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  • I am back!!

    Hi everyone,

    I have been on vacation in sunny Florida for the past week. In the past I had notified the message board when I was out of town, but on the advise of a friend I thought it was unwise to notify the world that my home was empty for a week - hey ya never know!

    I will be catching up on the 430 postings that were waiting for me this morning! If I do not respond to something that you seek my opinion on please bring it to my attention. I am working from home this morning as there is 12 inches of snow outside! I will catch up on all calls this afternoon.

    Best wishes to all!
    Lisa
    Knowledge is power ... Stay informed!
    YOU can make a difference - all you have to do is try!

    Dx age 12 current age 46 and counting!
    lost: 5 family members to HCM (SCD, Stroke, CHF)
    Others diagnosed living with HCM (or gene +) include - daughter, niece, nephew, cousin, sister and many many friends!
    Therapy - ICD (implanted 97, 01, 04 and 11, medication
    Currently not obstructed
    Complications - unnecessary pacemaker and stroke (unrelated to each other)

  • #2
    http://www.4hcm.org/gallery/JustFun?page=2

    here are some picutures of FLA!
    Knowledge is power ... Stay informed!
    YOU can make a difference - all you have to do is try!

    Dx age 12 current age 46 and counting!
    lost: 5 family members to HCM (SCD, Stroke, CHF)
    Others diagnosed living with HCM (or gene +) include - daughter, niece, nephew, cousin, sister and many many friends!
    Therapy - ICD (implanted 97, 01, 04 and 11, medication
    Currently not obstructed
    Complications - unnecessary pacemaker and stroke (unrelated to each other)

    Comment


    • #3
      It looks like you had a blast. So tell me. How did you know the fish was that poisonous? I'd have been dead, I guess!

      Reenie
      Reenie

      ****************
      Husband has HCM.
      3 kids - ages 23, 21, & 19. All presently clear of HCM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Wow,

        It looked so nice and warm there. I am glad you had a great time , you and your family deserve the time away. Welcome home to the snow and winter.

        Pam
        Dx @ 47 with HOCM & HF:11/00
        Guidant ICD:Mar.01, Recalled/replaced:6/05 w/ Medtronic device
        Lead failure,replaced 12/06.
        SF lead recall:07,extracted leads and new device 2012
        [email protected] Tufts, Boston:10/5/03; age 50. ( [email protected] 240 mmHg ++)
        Paroxysmal A-Fib: 06-07,2010 controlled w/sotalol dosing
        Genetic mutation 4/09, mother(d), brother, son, gene+
        Mother of 3, grandma of 3:Tim,27,Sarah,33w/6 y/o old Sophia, 5 y/o Jack, Laura 34, w/ 5 y/o old Benjamin

        Comment


        • #5
          Re the fish - it gave a good fight and when it broke the water it was the ugliest thing I had ever seen! my father yelled DO NOT TOUCH IT - IT IS POISIONOUS! I thought he was being a little dramatic - but when I got home I looked it up - BOY WAS HE RIGHT! Thanks DAD!

          Stone fish are found in only a few places in the world one of which is the Florida Keys they live on the reefs.

          Be careful out there!

          Lisa



          Stone fish:

          The fish is a member of the scorpionfish family. It is believed to be the deadliest fish in the world.
          This is the most venomous fish known. It reaches up to 35 cm in length and lives in the Indo-Pacific region and northern Australian waters, from Brisbane to 600 km north of Perth. Stonefish may be found from exposed sand and mud in tidal inlets to depths of 40 m. Lying on the sea bed, it is perfectly camouflaged and looks exactly like an encrusted rock. It feeds on small fish and shrimps. When they swim by, the stonefish opens its mouth with lightning speed and gulps them down. The whole attack lasts for just 0,015 seconds.

          Because the stonefish is vulnerable to attacks by bottom-feeding sharks and rays, it has found a way to defend itself- there is a row of 13 venomous spines along its back. In fact, the victim is the one who injures oneself. The stonefish is only dangerous if stepped on or caught. The thirteen dorsal spines project from venom glands along the back and venom is involuntarily expelled when pressure is exercised upon them. Then, a few weeks pass before the glands regenerate and recharge.

          The sting causes excruciating pain and a tremendous swelling rapidly develops with death of tissues. The severity of the symptoms depends on the depth of penetration and the number of spines involved. The effects of the venom are muscle weakness, temporary paralysis and shock, which may result in death if not treated. Fatalities are known in the Indo-Pacific region but not in Australian waters.

          One can prevent oneself from stonefish injury by wearing thick-soled shoes and treading very lightly- spines can piece through a shoe!

          Common Name: Reef Stonefish

          Scientific Name: Synanceia verrucosa

          Family: Scorpaenidae (Scorpionfishes)


          Habitat: Found on open reefs with shallow areas. Some individuals also found occupying coastal habitats of a silty or muddy nature.

          Size/Age: Grows to a length of 380 mm.


          Adaptations:


          Camouflage: The body colour of the Reef Stonefish varies depending on their surrounding environment. They are usually grey-brown in colour with red, yellow and orange blotches. This colour scheme allows the animal to blend in with their habitat, appearing as a rock or stone, as its name suggests. The variation in colour enhances their camouflage appearing as a mossy or algae-covered rock. Remaining stationary for most of the day also aids in its disguise.


          Sit-and-wait predator: This animal is known as an ambush or sit-and-wait predator, using its camouflaged to hide from prey as well as predators. When a prey item approaches, the Reef Stonefish suddenly springs into action gobbling up the surprised animal.


          Venomous spines: The Reef Stonefish has 13 venomous dorsal (top) spines, which are used for protection while resting on the reef. Summary: Body: This animal has a large bulky body adding to its appearance as a rock or stone. Its very large rounded pectoral fins are used for propping its body up and maintaining its balance.


          Locomotion: This animal stays within the confines of its habitat. Any movement is powered mostly by their tail, while their pectoral fins are used for balance. They are not known to migrate.


          Further Information:

          Venomous spines and glands: Stings from the 13 venomous spines cause excruciating pain. People need to be careful when swimming, snorkelling or SCUBA diving along reefs, as they may come into contact with the Reef Stonefish by kneeling or standing on reef platforms. The sting of this animal is known to be fatal. Along with the venomous spines, the Reef Stonefish also has 26 poisonous glands in its body, making this fish dangerous to eat.


          Relations: The Reef Stonefish belongs to the family Scorpaenidae (Scorpianfish), which includes Scorpionfish, Lionfish, Gurnards, Rockcods and Goblinfish.
          Knowledge is power ... Stay informed!
          YOU can make a difference - all you have to do is try!

          Dx age 12 current age 46 and counting!
          lost: 5 family members to HCM (SCD, Stroke, CHF)
          Others diagnosed living with HCM (or gene +) include - daughter, niece, nephew, cousin, sister and many many friends!
          Therapy - ICD (implanted 97, 01, 04 and 11, medication
          Currently not obstructed
          Complications - unnecessary pacemaker and stroke (unrelated to each other)

          Comment


          • #6
            Yeesh! I'm glad I haven't come across one of those before!

            Reenie
            Reenie

            ****************
            Husband has HCM.
            3 kids - ages 23, 21, & 19. All presently clear of HCM.

            Comment


            • #7
              My father in law like to have died because of one of those fish luckily the locals on the island of Guam took care of him and yes my husband told me they were dangerous very

              Shirley
              Diagnosed 2003
              Myectomy 2-23-2004
              Husband: Ken
              Son: John diagnosed 2004
              Daughter: Janet (free of HCM)

              Grandchildren: Drew 15,Aaron 13,Karen 9,Connor 9

              Comment


              • #8
                Hi Lisa !! Welcome Back!!

                OMG, if my parents lived there, I would never leave. I love the ocean, when I die, that is where I am living in the afterlife.
                The place you were was very beautiful.

                That fish though was one of the creepiest things I have ever seen -- ick.

                It looks like you all had a wonderful time, I'm glad you all had fun.

                It is good to have you back here.

                Hugs,
                Eileen
                49 yrs. old
                Diagnosed at 31.
                Cardiac Arrest 2003, RF Ablation in AZ, no positive result -
                First ICD 2003 - In 2006 lead went bad, abandoned lead, threaded new one & new generator
                Myectomy 5-5-05 at The Cleveland Clinic - Dr. Lever & Dr. Smedira -heart surgeon.
                Currently have Grade 2 Diastolic Dysfunction with pulmonary hypertension & pulmonary edema.
                My brother passed away suddenly at 34 yrs old from HCM.
                2 teenage children, ages 17 and 15.

                Comment


                • #9
                  It looks so beautiful, although I'm sure pictures don't do it justice. Glad you enjoyed yourself, what a great place to relax and enjoy life and all its beauty. (Glad your back though)

                  Pam
                  It's not what you gather, but what you scatter that tells what kind of life you have lived.

                  Dx in Feb/99. Obstructed. No ICD, no surgeries, no family history. 2 sons ages 14 and 6.

                  Comment

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