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Calcium channel blockers w/beta blockers

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  • Calcium channel blockers w/beta blockers

    what is the reason to take caution with these together??
    \"It is not length of life, but depth of life.\"

    Ralph Waldo Emerson

  • #2
    Re: Calcium channel blockers w/beta blockers

    alcium-channel blocker

    any of a class of drugs used in treating hypertension , angina pectoris , and certain arrhythmias . They prevent the calcium ions needed for muscle contraction from entering the cells of smooth and cardiac muscle. This causes blood vessel walls to relax and blood to flow more freely to the heart, lowering blood pressure and relieving anginal pain. Some calcium-channel blockers, such as Procardia (nifedipine), slow the electrical impulses that run through heart muscle, thus regulating arrhythmias. Cardizem (diltiazem) is a common calcium-channel blocker.


    beta-blocker

    (bā´te ăd&180;renűr´jĬk) or beta-adrenergic blocking agent , drug that reduces the symptoms connected with hypertension , cardiac arrhythmias , angina pectoris , migraine headaches, and other disorders related to the sympathetic nervous system . Beta-blockers also are sometimes given after heart attacks to stabilize the heartbeat. Within the sympathetic nervous system, beta-adrenergic receptors are located mainly in the heart, lungs, kidneys, and blood vessels. Beta-blockers compete with the nerve-stimulating hormone epinephrine for these receptor sites and thus interfere with the action of epinephrine, lowering blood pressure and heart rate, stopping arrhythmias, and preventing migraine headaches. Because it is also epinephrine that prepares the body for “fight or flight” in stressful or fearful situations, beta-blockers are sometimes used as antianxiety drugs , especially for stage fright and the like. People taking a beta-blocker must avoid caffeine, alcohol, and salty foods, because the interaction of those substances and the drug can raise the heart rate and blood pressure. Propranolol (Inderal) is a commonly used beta-blocker.

    Although they are not completely interchangeable, nor do they use the same method of attack, notice the overlap of maladies these two types of drugs treat. Since we are all different, care must be taken as to how much of which drug, or combination of drugs, is best for each individual.
    Burt

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    • #3
      Re: Calcium channel blockers w/beta blockers

      People taking a beta-blocker must avoid caffeine, alcohol, and salty foods, because the interaction of those substances and the drug can raise the heart rate and blood pressure.
      the specialist i saw last summer (who knows i'm on beta-blockers) said that people with hcm should not in fact avoid salt; that if anything they should err on the side of more salt than less salt. i don't know how this meshes with what you say about beta-blockers above.

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      • #4
        Re: Calcium channel blockers w/beta blockers

        Hi Mongo,
        I did not mean to imply that the first two paragraphs in my post were my own. I downloaded them from internet searches.

        Regarding salt however, because of medical conditions I’ve had long before my HCM was diagnosed, I have had it restricted in my diet for years. I also know many people who, for one reason or another are also on a restricted salt diet. (Mine also restricts salt substitutes.)

        This is the first time I have ever heard of someone advocating the use of salt – at least in this day and age. I have also read a number of articles which stated that the average American now consumes many times the necessary amount of salt required to maintain health. Sounds to me like somewhere along the line somebody was misinformed, misunderstood, or misspoken. If you are currently on such a regimen, I would suggest doing a little internet research yourself. Who knows - You may be right – I don’t know everything. There could be conditions where overdosing on salt is actually advisable. We did pop salt pills in the summer in Korea – but I was an invincible kid then.
        Burt

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        • #5
          Re: Calcium channel blockers w/beta blockers

          This is the first time I have ever heard of someone advocating the use of salt – at least in this day and age. I have also read a number of articles which stated that the average American now consumes many times the necessary amount of salt required to maintain health. Sounds to me like somewhere along the line somebody was misinformed, misunderstood, or misspoken.
          burt,

          i wasn't clear enough. i was not advised to over-dose on salt. far from it. the specialist in question--and he is quite the authority (recommended by lisa and everything)--was only emphasizing that it is absolutely not good for hcm'ers to go on a reduced salt diet (unless i suppose there's other underlying conditions that might call for it). his point was that it was almost better if i ate more salt than if i ate less. as for the whys, i don't know enough about it--but this doctor's credentials are above reproach for me.

          as for me, i eat mostly home-cooked food containing not much more salt than 2500 mg a day, if that. i just don't torture myself with salt-less food anymore (as my original non-specialist cardiologist had me doing).

          mongo

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          • #6
            Re: Calcium channel blockers w/beta blockers

            I located this article on the internet and found it quite interesting.

            http://www.saltinstitute.org/28.html

            Burt

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            • #7
              Re: Calcium channel blockers w/beta blockers

              Burt - There was a discussion of this on the boards before. If you do not have heart failure issues, and have HCM, it is actually adviseable to eat alot of salt. It increases your fluid retention level and blood pressure (which is often low in HCM'ers like myself) which is good for overworking HCM hearts with gradients. I have been SPECIFICALLY ADVISED to eat alot of salt and drink alot of water, especially when it is hot outside and am losing fluids.

              Conversely, my Dad, who has HCM but also has heart failure, has been advised to limit his salt and limit his fluids.

              It all depends on the person's situation.....
              Daughter of Father with HCM
              Diagnosed with HCM 1999.
              Full term pregnancy - Son born 11/01
              ICD implanted 2/03; generator replaced 2/2005 and 2/2012
              Myectomy 8/11/06 - Joe Dearani - Mayo Clinic.

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              • #8
                Re: Calcium channel blockers w/beta blockers

                I am on the "eat salt" plan myself - strange but true. Those with low b/p benefit from salt. Yet one more reason why having HCM is so unique!

                Lisa
                Knowledge is power ... Stay informed!
                YOU can make a difference - all you have to do is try!

                Dx age 12 current age 46 and counting!
                lost: 5 family members to HCM (SCD, Stroke, CHF)
                Others diagnosed living with HCM (or gene +) include - daughter, niece, nephew, cousin, sister and many many friends!
                Therapy - ICD (implanted 97, 01, 04 and 11, medication
                Currently not obstructed
                Complications - unnecessary pacemaker and stroke (unrelated to each other)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Calcium channel blockers w/beta blockers

                  Vee-eery interesting,
                  The article I referred to in my earlier post had some interesting points along the same lines, but it also said (with wide variations) that we normally eat about seven times the salt that’s actually required. The article is from the Salt Institute.

                  In my own case, I’m hypertensive, renal, diabetic, and have water retention issues - all of which dictate a restricted salt intake. I’ll bet that with the canned and preprocessed foods I eat, along with the number of times I eat out, I’m still getting much more then the normal requirement of salt – even though I never ever touch a salt shaker. (Except for chicken soup. Without salt that stuff is totally inedible – but then I don’t have it very often.)

                  So we each do what is best for us. Life is a whole series of compromises in any event.
                  Burt

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