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Defib test

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Largehearted I miss living in Europe, specifically Munich, GermanyI like to think out loud. Some of my ruminations can be found at beinganddoing.wordpress.com. I love to cook and eat, but hate to clean up. I tend to be confident in my opinions, but will change when presented with a compelling enough reason/argument. Find out more about Largehearted
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  • angall
    replied
    Reenie
    I never knew why they kept testing my ICD every year via shock. I just thought it was the "thing to do" yearly when you have an ICD.

    It's no big deal. I go the day before the ICD test for an x-ray, blood test and talk with the doctor that will be doing the procedure. The next day I am admitted, taken to the cath lab, put to sleep, wake up then taken to my room. If all goes well, I go home the same day. If there is unforeseen complications, who knows?? I have been very fortunate that my ICD is working and no complications.

    I'm good to go until Feburary 2006.

    Leave a comment:


  • shirleymahoney
    replied
    Well i can't get paced anymore my top lead don't work anymore, it was shorting out last year and now they said it is doing nothing so they turned it off but said it would still shock me if i needed it, she said that comes from the ventricle lead


    Shirley

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  • Reenie
    replied
    Esther, I'm glad you told us why some people have their ICD's tested that way. I wasn't sure if it was a patient-by-patient decision or a doctor's preference. Maybe it could be a combination of the two.

    Reenie

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  • angall
    replied
    Reenie wrote:
    I know several people here go that route to test their ICD's but my husband's doctors have never suggested this to him. They interrogate the device regularly and they test the threshholds by pacing him, but haven't ever forced it to decide to shock him since the day it was implanted. I'm not sure why one method is preferred over the other.


    Terry wrote:
    Same here. I get paced every 3 months. I have never even heard of people getting shocked to test the device. I would never have gotten it if that was the case. I would think there's a reason why one method is preferred over the other... I wonder what it is. *shrug*

    I recently had my ICD checked by being shocked. The doctor that was to perform the test told me that I must have this done once a year because when my ICD was inplanted, they place a lead wire in an unusual place in my heart. I also have my ICD interrogated every 3 months.
    Talk about keeping an eye on my ICD function....lol

    Leave a comment:


  • notadude
    replied
    Originally posted by Reenie
    I know several people here go that route to test their ICD's but my husband's doctors have never suggested this to him. They interrogate the device regularly and they test the threshholds by pacing him, but haven't ever forced it to decide to shock him since the day it was implanted. I'm not sure why one method is preferred over the other.

    Reenie
    Same here. I get paced every 3 months. I have never even heard of people getting shocked to test the device. I would never have gotten it if that was the case. I would think there's a reason why one method is preferred over the other... I wonder what it is. *shrug*

    Hugs, Terry

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  • Pam Alexson
    replied
    Leon,

    Glad to hear all went well for you.

    Pam

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  • Largehearted
    replied
    The only thing they said regarding time-frame is that those who are pacer dependent are high on the list. Since I pace less than 1% of the time it could be a while. Somewhere in the EP lab I heard them say something about needing to change about 300 devices. It could be this fall before they get to me.

    Leon

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  • shirleymahoney
    replied
    Leon

    I'm glad you got your test done and everything came out good and like Reenie said let us know when your battery will be changed

    Shirley

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  • Reenie
    replied
    I'm glad to hear that you came through with flying colors. Keep us posted on the replacement, too. Did they give you a time frame?

    Reenie

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  • Largehearted
    replied
    Hi all.
    Yesterday was my defib check and everything testing out great. This time I did not go into a-fib!! I was also informed that I am on the list of those needing to have their Medtronic device changed, so somewhere in the near future I guess that will happen too.

    I am still a bit woozy, but other than that ready to face the day.

    Peace,

    Leon

    Leave a comment:


  • Linda
    replied
    Pam, thanks for filling in #'s. I think it will give people a better idea which # goes with which feature and make it a bit more clear. Linda

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  • Pam Alexson
    replied
    Linda ,

    That all made sense. My Ep just told me last week that my threshold was 2.2 My rate settings are 50 and 180( defibrilator ) and at 120 my pacer will keep pacing to bring the rate below 120.
    Thanks .

    Pam

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  • Linda
    replied
    Threshold refers to the minimum amt of electrical output needed from the device to make the heart contract if it is a pacemaker or to defib the heart if it is an ICD. This is tested to make sure the lead is in the best position and that there is an adequate "safety margin" to make sure the device provides enough output when actually needed. You want to use the lowest amount needed, to preserve battery life and for best safety for the heart. This amt needed depends on several things - meds a patient is taking, the lead type, the location of the tip of the lead, the amt of tissue built up around the tip of the lead which is dependent on length of time the lead has been in place, etc.

    The # rates of settings for pacing or defib are totally different things. Those numbers count the heart rate and deliver the therapy - (pacing, defib) according to what has been programmed for that particular person.

    Basically, the # rates tell when therapy is to be delivered and the thresholds tell how much energy will be needed to do the job right. Hope I've made some sense of this. Maybe some of our engineers will chime in and simplify it all for us.

    Linda

    Leave a comment:


  • Reenie
    replied
    Heather, I went and reread your post about threshholds. This is what you said.

    As for my thresholds, he said they were 3.5 and 4.5. I believe he left the 3.5 alone, but moved the 4.5 down to 4.
    Those numbers don't mean anything to me. The threshholds I'm used to seeing when my husband gets his interrogated is that it paces for bradycardia at 40 bpm, it paces to stop an arrhythmia at 180 and if that doesn't work, it will shock him. There are also numbers that indicate how much battery juice it takes to start therapy. I didn't answer your question because I just didn't understand it. Hopefully someone else can help you.

    Reenie

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  • heather
    replied
    I see a lot of discussions about thresholds.....Did anyone see my post above about them? I'm not sure what they are. Does anyone know what your thresholds are set at?

    Heather

    Leave a comment:

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