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Defibrillators for School

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  • Georgie Brewster, RN
    replied
    Re: Defibrillators for School

    I found the best place to buy AEDS-thanks to Cynthia and all of her good words on the company! Some of my history;

    I am a school district nurse in Duluth, MN and have spent about the entire (!!!) fall sports season pulling together all the protocol info from 16 schools and 20 of our nurses only to stumble across a site that has 3 model protocols posted. I was amazed to see the wealth of information & intelligent based articles on Cardiac issues. the site is called www.MomsTeam.com. Since I am a cardiac trained RN I will tell you this is very good information for all of us and it is FREE.

    Then the best part they sell the AEDs for dollars over the wholesale price. Give them a try if you need top quality AEDs for a great Price.

    Georgina Brewster (Georgie) RN, MBA

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  • jujemendoza2002
    replied
    Re: Defibrillators for School

    That's great news, I am so glad to hear that there is more schools gonna get defibrillators. I hope everything goes well for your family, good-luck!

    Leave a comment:


  • mtlieb
    replied
    Re: Defibrillators for School

    Thank you Reenie and Mary,

    I guess just because i am an 'older' student, it doesn't mean that the topic is any less pertinent. I'll start checking into it

    Jim

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  • Toogoofy317
    replied
    Re: Defibrillators for School

    Jim,

    It is a good thing to let your professors know what you are up against. I have found that most are very co-operative and want to help in any way they can. As a matter-of-fact it was my Hummanaties professor who called 911 for me last night. I got severe chest pain in the middle of lecture. She knew what was going on and was able to help me. If she hadn't known she probably would have totally freaked on me.

    As far as defibs go my community college has one and is normally carried around by security. They are normally the first to arrive on scene. In my instance the fire house is also right across the street so they were there fairly quick. So no Jim not a different question at all! We are students too and covered under the same protection.

    Your odd friend,
    Mary S.

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  • Reenie
    replied
    Re: Defibrillators for School

    In my opinion it never hurts to ask questions.

    Reenie

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  • mtlieb
    replied
    Re: Defibrillators for School

    Hi all,

    I'm curious about the school/defibrillator issue, but figured it didn't apply to me since i am an older graduate student rather than an elementary or high school student. If this is the case, then i'll apologize for butting in and won't worry about it. But since i've been having so many difficulties lately, and i do not as of yet have an ICD, i thought it couldn't hurt to ask...

    Given that i spend so much time on or near campus here, would you think it's a smart idea for me to at least ascertain if a defibrillator is available and where it is located? Would my instructors/advisors need to be trained in how to use it? If i ever did need it, wouldn't it seem more likely that trained paramedics will arrive on the scene long before anybody locates the on-campus defibrillator and/or quickly learns how to use it?

    Thanks for any input you have. I have not yet had any real difficulties with sustained arrhythmias, but the fact remains that my dad (with HCM) never had a documented arrhythmia in his life until he had the one that killed him in his fifties. Combined with my magical ever-increasing gradient and recent bouts of near-syncope, it is an issue that does concern me somewhat.

    Thanks again,

    Jim

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Defibrillators for School

    Thanks to everyone for their comments. After my meeting they have agreed to the defibrillator. In fact, we are in the process of having defibrillators placed in all the schools in our area to benefit everyone. Thanks again for the great advice.

    Leave a comment:


  • Millie Acosta
    replied
    Re: Defibrillators for School

    Burt,

    I agree. Jeremy is very fortunate that his buddies at school always help him out!

    Leave a comment:


  • Burton Borrok
    replied
    Re: Defibrillators for School

    Hi all,
    You reminded me of a time in elementary school – must have been around the fourth or fifth grade. One of the students was an epileptic that had seizures fairly often. Kids can be cruel, but sometimes they can also be inspirations.

    The boy, let’s call him Jim, was never, ever left alone. His seizures were such that he didn’t fall down, but he would just stand there during the seizure. When we played stick ball in the street there was always someone to guide him to the curb if need be. Someone always called for him to go to school, and returned him home. Then we would call for him to go out and play, and again take him home afterward. It was always like that. Jim was our project, and he lived as full a life as possible because of it.

    If the kids in school are made to see your children as projects needing their help, I think you will be amazed at how wonderfully they will be treated. It really is a great world.
    Burt

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  • Millie Acosta
    replied
    Re: Defibrillators for School

    Hi Kay,

    My son, Jeremy 11 yrs. old, has HCM. Although, he has an AICD I was able to get an external defibrillator for the school. One could never be too cautious. I called my local public official and got in touch with the Department of Public Health in Delaware to obtain one for the school. It was painful and frustrating some days, but persistence is the key. Make the calls and then follow up, follow up and follow up some more. (Make sure you speak to one person all the time to avoid being bounced around). Before I started the process, I informed the school Principal and the Nurse that I was going to obtain one for the school. Once the device was awarded, the Dept. of Health came to the school to provide training for the Nurse and she then trained faculty. The Nurse took it one step further and purchased a cabinet (looks like the ones that keep the fire extinguishers) to place the device. The neat thing about this is that when you open the door and remove the equipment, it signals 911 automatically is help is sent out to the school.

    Another thing I did for my child beside meeting with the school (and you're doing the right thing) is provide them with a one-pager that has his diagnosis, insurance information, doctors numbers, the children's hospitals, our phone numbers, his meds. -- a quick reference sheet. I give a copy to all of his teachers, principal and nurse. Anytime we change meds, I update it and provide copies. By the way, I always leave this with family members as well. In addition, my husband and I carry one all the time. You would be surprised how you can forget your child's date of birth in an emergency let alone remember meds and miligrams. I can send a copy this way you can get an idea.

    The other thing is the school has an elevator and I made arrangements for Jeremy to take the elevator with a buddy assigned to him. He also drinks alot of fluids during the day, so he needs to go to bathroom alot and they needed to accommodate him in this respect. Bottom line is, he is your child who has special needs that need to be met. The school needs to comply for two simply reasons: 1) if it is a private or public school - you're paying for it via tuition or your taxes; 2) most importantly, there are disability laws that protect him and the school needs to abide.

    Almost forgot, Jeremy is restricted from gym but he still attends so that he does not feel different or left out. Some days he's the teacher's assistant (with his own whistle ) When they play kick ball, he kicks someone else runs for him and likewise for other activities.

    Sorry to have written so much, but I know how hard it is letting go of full control. That's how I feel when he is not with me or my husband. For peace of mind, I felt better putting a proactive plan in place. Hope this helps.

    Leave a comment:


  • SheliRenee
    replied
    Re: Defibrillators for School

    Hi Kay -

    Having a child with HOCM has caused me to have the same concerns that you have regarding your son and the schools. We also carry an AED around with us, however, we were uncomfortable with the idea that we might have to leave it at the school with Keanu. Way too expensive to ask the teacher to be responsible for it. After a lot of "think" time on the subject I decided that I would be home-schooling him. As far as your situation, can't something be done under any sort of a disabled persons law in your state? Don't the schools have to do whatever it takes to accommodate your son and his physical handicap...for example... a deaf child has the right to attend his regular school and have signing translators provided by the district. Would this be the same? I really like the idea of going to the newspaper, but I'm the sort that likes to stir things up. Be the squeaky wheel and do whatever it takes.....Go forth and make some noise. Good luck and let us know if there is anything we can do.

    SheliRenee

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  • jujemendoza2002
    replied
    Re: Defibrillators for School

    You sound just like me. I too had a son who died at 6 years old from the hcm at school. I would reaaly put the pressure down on the school and maybe go to your news papers, maybe they would be interested in making a story that will benefit your child and the public awareness. THAT'S WHAT I DID, and my daughter got her defibrillator at school. Matter of fact she couldn't start school with her class due to the fact they did not have the device there, but they got it now. Your on the right track!!! Maybe sometime if you want I can share more with you on this, I still got the news paper from where the school getting the defibrillator made front page news... Jen

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  • Linda
    replied
    Re: Defibrillators for School

    Sarah, thanks for adding that part about including the school nurse. I always asked her to schedule the team conference, she always gave a little inservice about the condition, and I supplemented the info. We had a written emergency care plan that each member was given a copy of. An advantage to this was that I was able to see first hand, the nurse's understanding of the whole thing. It worked great for us, everyone was on board and anxious to work together. I guess I just took that part for granted when I posted. The message board takes teamwork too - Thanks.
    Sharon mentioned the liability issue which was brought up to us one time. It was not about AED's, but in reference to PE teachers being trained in CPR. When you consider the liability of a standard of care available and not offered plus the Good Samaritan coverage, the liability takes on a different appearance. It takes persistance and perserverance, but we're moving ahead. It's also important to point out that the AED is not there for one child only, but anyone in the area - staff, student, or visitor. It's more likely to be used on middle-aged or older staff or visitor than a student. Linda

    Leave a comment:


  • Reenie
    replied
    Re: Defibrillators for School

    Kay, under Sharon's post are some little icons, Profile, PM, Email, and WWW. Click on the one that says PM and it'll take you to the right place.

    Reenie

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Re: Defibrillators for School

    Thanks to everyone for your comments. Sharon, I have viewed your videotape on your website. Yes, I am very interested in a copy. How do I "PM" you my address and what do I owe you for the tape. I have found a website for grants for defibrillators in school. I will let everyone know how my meeting on Friday turns out. This website is a Godsend. God bless you all!

    Leave a comment:

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